Kindle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
From a technical perspective, how do you make your images digital?  Do you draw them freehand then scan them into the computer?  Do you use Adobe Illustrator, then save the file as an image?  Other?  Thanks for the input!
Christine
 
4

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I draw with good old pencils, can`t beat the tactile nature of pencil on paper. Scan `em into photoshop, do a negative mask on them to turn them into perfect pngs and use that as an asset. The assets can be characters on TOP of backgrounds...like an animated cel on a painted background. I may do some videos, after I have my first books out in April, to show techniques. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
I do the rough sketch in pencil on paper, then I scan it into the computer. I go over the lines with my Wacom tablet, to create digital line art. Then I color the art in either Manga Studio, or if MS is giving me problems (like it was the other day), I just use Paint.net.

I used to use Photoshop years ago, but I just can't afford it these days.
 
4

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Karen, you can get the whole adobe suite as a subscription...think its 17 pound a month. You get photoshop, illustrator, flash, indesign all sorts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for the information.  Have either of you used the tablets they sell at Best Buy where you draw on the tablet with the electronic pen while the lines appear on your computer screen?  I was looking at that the other day and wondering if it was hard to use. 
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
The majority of the artwork I've been doing lately has been doing character design and illustrating comic book pages for my graphic novel series.

For character design, I draw on paper. I'm pretty low-tech when I work on paper - I use a plain old mechanical pencil (BIC Pencil #2), a Staedtler eraser, and either 8.5 x 11 or 11 x 17 paper. When I finish the link work, I'll scan the artwork into my computer and I'll either color over the rough pencil linework in Photoshop, or I'll ink and color it digitally in Flash. I use a Wacom Cintiq monitor where you can draw directly on the screen with a stylus.

For illustrating comic book pages and marketing materials, I usually draw digitally in Flash on my computer or with Adobe Illustator Draw on my iPad (which is a fantastic FREE app on the App Store). I had to train myself a bit to get used to illustrating on an iPad so I can use it when I'm away from my computer to continue working. I use a Wacom Intuos Creative Stylus 2 as my stylus of choice for the iPad, mainly because it's so similar to a Wacom Cintiq stylus that I feel most comfortable using. When I draw digitally in Flash on my computer, I do my rough pencil art and final inks / colors in Flash. I enjoy the line quality of the brush tools in Flash for inking.
Christine Tate said:
Thank you for the information. Have either of you used the tablets they sell at Best Buy where you draw on the tablet with the electronic pen while the lines appear on your computer screen? I was looking at that the other day and wondering if it was hard to use.
I have a Wacom Tablet, but I never got used to drawing full artwork from the tablet to the screen. I usually had to draw the linework first on paper, and then use the Wacom Tablet to paint over the artwork. That's the reason I got a Wacom Cintiq where you can draw directly on the screen into the computer, so I could see where the pen is laying as I draw. Drawing on a wacom tablet was tough for me, because you're not actually drawing on the screen and that made it difficult for me to do artwork entirely with the tablet because I couldn't see where the pen was in relation to what lines were appearing on the computer screen. The Wacom Tablet works wonderfully for painting over artwork I'd draw on paper and scanned into the computer, and I'd highly recommend that option. You can get a Wacom or Bamboo Tablet at a reasonable price and be able to create digital artwork easily.
 
4

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Good info Weibart. Horses for courses really. I find a disconnect drawing on a wacom BUT it is possible. The cintiqs are great but TOO pricey. I just love drawing on paper, the tooth it has. All colour is digital thereafter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Weibart said:
I have a Wacom Tablet, but I never got used to drawing full artwork from the tablet to the screen. I usually had to draw the linework first on paper, and then use the Wacom Tablet to paint over the artwork. That's the reason I got a Wacom Cintiq where you can draw directly on the screen into the computer, so I could see where the pen is laying as I draw.
Yeah, same here. I had a cheap, tiny Wacom tablet for years that I used just for coloring. I never could quite get comfortable drawing from scratch on it. Granted, like I said, I mostly do my lineart on paper these days anyway, but I like the fact that I CAN draw on the Cintiq when I want to; it's come in handy a few times. Plus it makes creating line art from my sketches a lot easier.

Andrew Murray: Yeah, I'm glad the subscription option is available instead of having to pay $800 for Photoshop, or whatever the ridiculous going rate is. Right now I don't know if Adobe has anything I need that I can't get from another piece of software I already have, but I'm glad the option is there at the very least.

Weibart: Impressed that you're doing comics. I slugged away at them for years, then switched to writing novels-- it's so much easier!
*runs away before anyone on Kboards realizes she just called writing 'easy'*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Julie W said:
Many of you are mentioning using a scanner. Is there scanner you recommend to ensure high quality scans for your drawings?
I used the same cheap scanner from 1999-2010 (which made a sound I called the "dying cow noise" whenever it was in use), so I'm probably not a good person to ask about scanner quality:). Right now though I'm using a HP Scanjet 4850, and it's performing fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
12x9" Wacom tablet and Paint Tool Sai. If I need text, I drop the file into Gimp.  I draw on paper about once a year, and it never looks good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I have a tablet that is basically like a second monitor (yiynova msp19u). I use photoshop cs5 and paint directly on the screen as though I was using a canvas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Karen Mead said:
I used the same cheap scanner from 1999-2010 (which made a sound I called the "dying cow noise" whenever it was in use), so I'm probably not a good person to ask about scanner quality:). Right now though I'm using a HP Scanjet 4850, and it's performing fine.
I haven't owned a scanner for 10 years and am thinking of getting one for some children's book illustrations. So anything helps, haha.

For my drawings I use my iPad with some great apps and a special pen. My sister still does paper and watercolor paints.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Wacom tablet is life. It just makes the process so much easier and quicker. After I got mine, never went back to paper. With the right program and brushes it feels like using a pencil anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Scila said:
Wacom tablet is life. It just makes the process so much easier and quicker. After I got mine, never went back to paper. With the right program and brushes it feels like using a pencil anyway.
And for people who need the physical resistance of using a pencil and paper, they have felt nibs (which are amazing), or you can just literally tape a piece of paper over your tablet. Just don't do both, because a felt nib will get worn down in about an hour I'd you draw on paper with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,296 Posts
Woo! A question I actually have experience to answer!

From a technical perspective, how do you make your images digital?

Well, drawing anything on a computer is automatically digital. :)

Do you draw them freehand then scan them into the computer?

Sometimes, but not often honestly. I like sketching on the computer directly. Though sometimes I do sketch with pencil and paper and if I do that, I scan my art.
I just have a 3-in-1 Brother scanner/printer/fax and I scan it on that.
I've even taken photos before (but I was trained in school to take photos of art, so it's not just "snap a shot with my phone") and digitized that.

Do you use Adobe Illustrator, then save the file as an image?

I prefer Adobe Photoshop CS6 for drawing and painting.
I use Adobe Illustrator for vector work only.

Other good programs: Paint Tool Sai, Inkscape (free version of Illustrator basically), Gimp (Free Photoshop), and openCanvas (A free Japanese program with very special style options. Takes learning.)


Tablets:


I love my tablet. Absolutely.
I use a Wacom Intuos 4 professional Medium tablet.
It took getting used to tablets, but I got used to them like ten years ago on a really cheap shitty tablet that cost like $40.
Getting a Wacom was a game changer. It gives the ability to paint on my computer like I was using a brush without the mess and with a beautiful thing called UNDO!

If you're going to get a tablet, I can't recommend Wacom enough. I've had all kinds of tablets but Wacom is the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
I want to point out out that SAI is also Japanese, so even in the English version, some of the menus and dialogue boxes don't make an ounce of sense.  But it has a really shallow learning curve, so it doesn't really matter too much.

Also, it's just about the only program out there that let's you do paint and vector on the same canvas. And proper vector.  It's pretty much designed for doing detailed perspective work as well as foreground characters in comics and manga without having to switch back and forth between program's. Although, it has no text option in the current version. It'll be added in 2.0 though. There's a ore-release version floating around out there, but it's only in Japanese.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
The tablet has also saved my wrists. I got to the point where I've used my tablet to reduce repetitive stress on my wrists.

I have an Epson perfection 800 scanner that I just got to replace an Epson perfection 700 scanner that died on me. The new one has LED - based lighting as opposed to the cold cathode (fluorescent) lamp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Arshness said:
Do you draw them freehand then scan them into the computer?
Sometimes, but not often honestly. I like sketching on the computer directly. Though sometimes I do sketch with pencil and paper and if I do that, I scan my art.
I just have a 3-in-1 Brother scanner/printer/fax and I scan it on that.
When you draw them freehand, do you use colored pencils or a different origination medium? Also, do you know how that would translate into finished published quality?
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top