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JamesHutchings said:
I tried to read it when I was younger, but I couldn't finish it.

I've noticed that a lot of fantasy writers are overly eager to tell you about their world, to the detriment of the story. So maybe The Silmarillion helped make Lord of the Rings a better book, by giving Tolkien a way to get a lot of the background out of his system.
YES!
 

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RedTash said:
Glad you liked it. I'll try and come out with a series of ten sequels.
 

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mooshie78 said:
I've read it twice. It is very dry in places, other parts are very good. I probably won't re-read it in future LOTR re-reads--at least not for many years.

The overarching story of the silmarils etc. is very interesting, but it's told in more of a history book/bible type of fashion so it's a much denser and dryer read than LOTR. So I'd say it's really only for major LOTR fans who basically want to read a history book about middle earth full of creation stores, legends etc.
I agree with mooshie - it's a very dry read (nothing like LOTR or The Hobbit). I tried reading it twice; I didn't even get a third of the way in before I gave up both times.

My hubby, however, first read LOTR in 6th grade (about 11 or 12 years old), and it spoiled him for reading any other fiction :); he's read The Silmarillion through at least twice. So if you're really, really, really into Tolkien, you might be able to persevere. :)
 

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I believe I read it around 30 years ago (because I read everything by Tolkien I could get my hands on after LOTR and the Hobbit). But I didn't like it (or the other lesser Tolkien books) nearly as much as LOTR and the Hobbit (and I found the Hobbit somewhat annoying for the difference in writing style from LOTR). The Silmarillion also hasn't stood the test of time too well in my memory, as I read at least 1000 sci fi and fantasy books back then, and nowadays only can recall some decent ideas from a small portion of them-- and The Silmarillion is not among those.

However, I was a big fan of the appendices in The Return of the King. So much so, that it was part of my inspiration for researching the next 4000 years of what human history might be like, and writing a few stories to go with it.
 

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I've read it a couple times. It's for a very niche audience. If you love Tolkien and you're a fan of history, then you might be interested. The Silmarillion is Tolkien's Bible, it's literally the creation of the universe of Middle Earth with God and angels and the devil (Melkor) and the creation of elves and men, etc. And then all of the kings and wars and creatures leading up to the war of the ring. There is no hero or plot, it's just a historical record. Interesting, but not gripping.
 

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I like to think of the Silmarillion as an outline of what could have been other trilogies:

The Fall of Numenor

The Elves arrival in Middle Earth

And so much more. If you really enjoyed Lord of the Rings and would like more, the Silmarillion is worth a read with an open mind, but go in knowing the prose is archaic. Try and grab an illustrated edition as the colour plates soften the read.
 

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I've tried to read The Silmarillion numerous times. I never seem to be able to read more than a third of it before I fall to the temptation to skip ahead to the sections directly related to Lord of the Rings.

That said, The Children of Hurin.
 

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Doug DePew said:
I have The Silmarillion.

I've never read it all the way through. It's very complex. I'd say it's worth owning if you collect Tolkein, but it's not really a "sit down and read it" book. It provides a lot of backstory to the rest, but it isn't an easy read.
Complex is right! I found myself skipping, not a good thing, but lots of it are pure Tolkien. Read it and see for yourself.
 

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I forced myself to read it when I was in my teens - It was hard going, and like one of those old school text books from the fifties - once you finish the thing - you feel you have to start it over again because you've forgotten who did what when...(I'm getting flashbacks of school here...)

It is very much like you're reading an anthology of mythology and lore (that is a difficult translation from Elvish into English!!) 

Hmm, maybe if Robert Graves had edited it...but no - the way it reads is the point of the work - and that must be kept in mind. But the good news, though, is that when you finish it, you'll feel pround you have!!! (Just don't take a test on it afterwards...)
 

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The Silmarillion is a harder read than LOTR's but reading it will give you a much better perspective on the Rings.  This is the beginning of Tolkiens great story, in it he describes the creation of the world, Melkor's (Lucifer) role in the creation and the relationship between the Valar and the elves.  If you really want to know the story behind the enmity between the elves and Sauron, this book is a must read.
 

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Yes! I read the Silmarillion and listened to it on an Audiobook. LOTR fans may or may not like The Silmarillion. It takes a much wider view of Middle Earth and the language is much more lofty which might turn some people off. One of my my favorite tales was of Huan the Hound. If I remember correctly he...never mind. Best to find out yourself.
 
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