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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

Is it "that everyone but him knew about."
or
"that everyone but he knew about."

Also, is the "about" at the end of the sentence the bigger sin?

This is for my blurb, so super important.
 

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Honestly. . . . .my brain could probably make a case either way -- maybe if I saw the whole sentence, and not just one clause?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ann in Arlington said:
Honestly. . . . .my brain could probably make a case either way -- maybe if I saw the whole sentence, and not just one clause?
When he is also suspected of collaboration he has little choice but to team up with a rather motley alliance of people from a part of Nova's past that everyone but him seems to know about.
 

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Quiss said:
When he is also suspected of collaboration he has little choice but to team up with a rather motley alliance of people from a part of Nova's past that everyone but him seems to know about.
"people from a part of Nova's past that everyone seems to know about - except him."
 

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Quiss said:
When he is also suspected of collaboration he has little choice but to team up with a rather motley alliance of people from a part of Nova's past that everyone but him seems to know about.
When he is also suspected of collaboration, he has little choice but to team up with a rather motley alliance of strangers, from a part of Nova's past that everyone else seems to know about.

When in doubt, I just reconstruct the sentence. ::) :D
 

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I'm fairly certain "he" is strictly correct since it's the subject of "seems to know about." If you take out the "everyone but", you wouldn't say "that him seems to know about."

But use Andrea's suggestion, because it doesn't sound right to say "he" there, at least not to my ears.

Honestly, that sentence is convoluted, because you've got five ideas you're trying to convey. 1-He's suspected of collaboration. 2-He's got very few options. 3-He teams up with a motley alliance. 4-They know things about Nova's past. 5-He doesn't know them. You're trying to get a lot of information across, and I think that smaller sentences would make it easier to understand.

But I recognize that you didn't ask for advice about anything else, and I hate it when people give unasked-for advice, so I'm going to shut up now. :) Carry on, nothing to see here. *whistles*
 

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Forgive my pre-coffee dialogue fugue. Good God. I need a manager to keep me from posting before coffee.

Anyway, you're nervous about this blurb. It shows in the language you're using. I completely agree that smaller sentences would make it easier to understand.

Be decisive. What if you did something like: (Hero) has heard of inside jokes. This is his first "inside mystery".

Make it more inclusive, at least.
 

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This is as perfect an example as they come of an intractable grammar question: the inferred rule suggests that we ought to do something that a) looks weird and b) hardly anyone says aloud.

The solution in these cases is always the same: rewrite so that the grammar question no longer needs asking!
 
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