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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all -
I have been nearsighted for 40+ years. When I got beyond the 40-year-old mark, sure enough, I started needing reading glasses - BUT ONLY if I was wearing my glasses that corrected for nearsightedness. I am 55 now & can still read without my glasses most of the time. I have tried many variations of progressive lenses - without success. In fact, most of the time if I am reading I take my glasses off.

And here's why: I 'read' things at many different distances (holding book in my lap; reading documents on my desks - 3 different desks, 3 different heights; 3 different computer set-ups with 5 different monitor distances (dual monitors in 2 locations!).

Now how in the world is a person supposed to find a pair of reading glasses, or a progressive lenses prescription, that can possibly fit all these different needs. I don't really think my situation is unique. It seems that anyone who has been nearsighted since a child & reaches a 40+ age might still have a similar problem.

Currently I have progressive lenses; then I got a pair of 'stick-on' lenses that I put on the lower part of my lenses. I also have a couple of different strengths of small reading glasses that I put on OVER my glasses to read on my computer monitors.

This of course all LOOKS VERY WEIRD! But I cannot figure out how there is any hope for a comfortable reading experience overall given all my "requirements".

Does anyone else have similar issues? Figure out any way to address them without looking bizarre?
 

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I was having that problem after I turned 40.  I wear contacts but had to have the reading glasses.  Finally last year, I got multi-focal contacts and for me that has solved all of my issues.  I leave my contacts in and don't take them out.  I'm able to wear them for about 2-3 months before I have to switch them out.  Most of the eye doctors will tell you not to wear them that long.  I may take them out once in a while for soaking overnight, but most of the time I leave them in and use eye drops for rewetting.  The multi-focal lenses were the best solution for me.
 

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Many progressive lenses are basically bifocals, just with a smooth transition. If that's what yours are, you might ask about progressive trifocals. That way you have the in-between distance covered as well.

I have those; they took two weeks to get used to and slowed down my reading speed, but it's better than not seeing.

(I wish I could get multi-focal lenses, but I also have astigmatism and the doc said they weren't available for that yet. One of these days, though....)
 

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I solved the problem with laser surgery.  I had severe astigmatism and myopia all my life. . . .I remember coming home from the eye doctor the first time with glasses when I was about 7.  I'd never before realized that there were actual individual leaves on trees.  To me, they always looked like a fat brown stick with a fluffy green ball on top!

But I always hated wearing glasses and didn't have good luck with contacts so I swore if they ever figured out how to fix 'em permanently I was going to do it.  So 10 years ago I had lasik.  Worked like a charm.  At my most recent exam I was seeing 20/20 in one eye and 20/25 in the other.  Woo Hoo!  When I first had it done, I was to the point where I would have had to start with bifocals but instead I had another year or so before I had to go to readers.  And I can get them for $10 a pair -- way, WAY cheaper than prescription lenses.  I keep 4 or 5 pair at various places around the house where I might need to read something and have a pair I carry in my purse as well.

Ann
 

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Lucky you!!  They told me I wasn't a candidate.  :(

 

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Ann my story is identical to yours!  After my lasik surgery I was fine for awhile but they said I would be a candidate for readers as I aged  :eek:  I was about 55 then.  At that time I was also told I had cataracts but no problems, yet.  I did end up getting bifocals about 4 years ago, but it was not as if I couldn't see I just could not read.  Now one of my cataracts is making my close up reading fine and I am back to only long time reading readers (can even get them at the $1 store - that is if they had one here)
 

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Hi CegAbq,
Have you mentioned this to your optometrist? It is possible that he can adjust the prescription for your glasses to help. Mine did. I don't know if the type of lenses matters but I am using the polycarbonate (feather weight) type. (A joy after so many years of heavy glass lenses!  :D )

I have been nearsighted with minor astigmatism for as long as I can remember (20/200 without glasses). I have been wearing glasses to correct my vision since second grade. I am now 55 and have been wearling progressive lenses several years. My optometrist knows I work at a computer all day. He adjusted the prescription for my glasses to "soften" the distance vision a bit and enhance the vision for reading. Wearing my progressive lenses, I can read normal text easily from about six inches to over three feet away. It does mean that when driving on the highway that I cannot read the signs as soon as they are visible but I can read them soon enough.

I still take my glasses off when reading in bed, when reading fine print, or when removing splinters.  ::)

I did try contact lenses for a while but either would forget to put them in before leaving for work or would forget to carry my reading glasses. I then had to stop wearing them at all after getting a paper cut on one eye. ( Not easy to do while wearing glasses.  :eek: ) I now occasionally wear the daily disposable contacts for activities such as swimming when I could not wear glasses or for activities out in cold weather when my glasses would fog up.

While my daughter has had lasik surgery and is very happy with it, I have avoided it. I am certain I would miss the ability to see things that are very close (such as those pesky splinters) and I would miss how Christmas lights would look without my glasses. Anyone else love those unfocused balls of light?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Annalog -
1. Thanks for the great description; I think I will print & take it to my optometrist next time.
2. And how in the world did you get a papercut in your eye, at all, much less while wearing glasses!
 

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I have the progressive trifocals. I had a hard time getting used to them but once I did they are great. I broke my regular bifocal glasses and was forced to use the progressive lenses. After a week, I didn't have any problems with them. It was the 2nd pair that I had and had been switching out between glasses until I broke them. I am 59 and I also have the start of cataracts which is normal. I have thought about laser surgery, but heard that it causes dry eye problems and don't want to make my dry eyes any dryer. Wow a tongue twister on that one.
 

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Kathy said:
don't want to make my dry eyes any dryer.
I am going to keep practicing until I can say that one 3 times fast! I love tongue-twisters! Ooohhh - that's another thread!
 

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I've never had a problem with dry eyes.  But I think what happens is people who are used to having glass in front of their eyes take a while to get used to NOT having glass in front of their eyes.  They're feeling the air on their faces in places they're not used to it -- around they eyes -- and that makes them think 'oh, my eyes are dry'.  You feel it most when it's windy since you no longer have your 'windshield'.  :D

Ann
 

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It is interesting to read posts from people who like progressives. I wore them for a year and HATED them. I was forever moving my head around to find the optimum place to see through. Now I am still wearing trifocals but with lines. I love my lines! I can easily find the place on my glasses to look through because they are clearly marked by lines!

patrisha
 

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patrisha #150 said:
Now I am still wearing trifocals but with lines. I love my lines! I can easily find the place
But patrisha - how do only 3 fixed strengths work when the things that one wants to read are not necessarily at one of those 3 fixed distances?
 

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It took me about a week to get used to my first pair of progressive lenses. It takes a couple hours again each time I get new lenses. It took my sister several weeks to get used to her first progressive lenses. Looking down for steps seemed to be the worst for each of us.

How to get a paper cut on your eye while wearing glasses - Do not try the following at home (or anywhere else).

I had a PC in a vertical case under my desk. My desk tends to accumulate stacks of paper. (massive understatement! ::) ) When there was no more space on the desk for my monitory, keyboard, mouse, and stacks of paper, I started putting papers on top of the PC case. These stacks were not nice and neat but had corners of papers sticking out at various places. I dropped my pencil on the floor. While sitting in my chair, I rolled the chair back and leaned forward to pick up the pencil. The glasses I was wearing at that time would come slightly away from my face when I faced downward. The left side of my glasses frames caught one of the paper corners. As I kept reaching down, the paper followed the glasses as long as it could and then flipped past the glasses and along my eyeball resulting in a paper cut on edge of the lens of my eyeball. OUCH!!!! I put lots of eyedrops in my eye and kept my eye closed. This was on a Sunday evening.

I saw my optometrist the next morning. He was surprised that I had gotten a papercut on my eye as he knew I was always wearing either my glasses or my contact lenses when I was awake. Apparently the flap had already healed but with a slight bump. The optometrist gave me special drops to use and told me I should have contacted him immediately as eyes heal very quickly and this had healed in a wrong position. He said that the bump would probably go a way in a few years but it it did not then it could be sanded and that it would hurt more than my husband's cataract surgery. (I cannot remember the exact words but sanding the eyeball represents what he described.) He also said that I could not wear contact lenses until after he said it was OK.

The bump slowly went away. A couple years ago I asked if it was OK to wear contacts occasionally and he said it is now OK. I am carefull to not let my eyes get dry when wearing contact lenses and often put drops in my eyes before taking them out. (Eyes and contact lenses dry quickly in southern Arizona.)

I learned my lesson -- Never put stacks of paper where my face is likely to go past the side of the stack, with or without wearing glasses.
Anna
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Annalog - that is an amazing (& scary) story. I am so glad that your eye is OK now!
 

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CegAbq said:
Annalog - that is an amazing (& scary) story. I am so glad that your eye is OK now!
I was very lucky. I was more worried about the cut getting infected than my eyesight that night because when I opened my eyelid, I could see OK but I kept my eye closed as it hurt less that way. The next morning, my eye still hurt but I could see. I added more eyedrops and folded a gauze pad over my closed eyelid to make sure I kept it closed until I saw the optometrist.

In any case, it is definitely a reason to do what you can to protect your eyes and don't delay in taking care of any eye problems.
 

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patrisha #150 said:
It is interesting to read posts from people who like progressives. I wore them for a year and HATED them. I was forever moving my head around to find the optimum place to see through. Now I am still wearing trifocals but with lines. I love my lines! I can easily find the place on my glasses to look through because they are clearly marked by lines!
I have tried to get used to progressives several times but always return to my lined trifocals (I'm 54). Like you, I like having defined areas to choose from. The worst thing about the progressives for me was having to move my head back and forth while reading a book to keep the words in focus.
 

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I always preferred the lined trifocals!  Hated the progressive.

I got a cut in one of my eyes, a piece of sand got under a hard contact lens (this was many years ago, about 45 years, before soft lens which I would not have been able to wear anyway) I have a permanent scar in my eye, and even with the lasik it is still there, giving me double vision, one crispy clear the other not just a little fuzzy.

With the lasik I can no longer thread a needle, even with cheaters it is difficult, and I do miss the fuzzy balls at Christmas as well.
 

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Anju No. 469 said:
I always preferred the lined trifocals! Hated the progressive.

I got a cut in one of my eyes, a piece of sand got under a hard contact lens (this was many years ago, about 45 years, before soft lens which I would not have been able to wear anyway) I have a permanent scar in my eye, and even with the lasik it is still there, giving me double vision, one crispy clear the other not just a little fuzzy.

With the lasik I can no longer thread a needle, even with cheaters it is difficult, and I do miss the fuzzy balls at Christmas as well.
Anju, that must have hurt! I grew up in Tucson where I would get caught in at least a couple "dust devils" each summer. The horror stories I heard from friends who had contacts kept me from wanting them when I was young. Also, I was one of those "geeks" who wore big black plastic frames in high school. I look back at old pictures and cringe. I much prefer my current big brown metal ones. ;D My daughter dispairs of me ever wearing fashionable frames but I prefer glasses big enough that I can see everything through them.

I wonder if the reason I have no problems with my progressive lenses is that my lenses are large. When I pick frames, I usually choose the largest in the store. My test is that I should only be able to see the frames when I am looking as far up, right, down, and left as is comfortable. I want the largest field of view I can get. For that reason, my glasses fit very close to my eyes (my eyelashes nearly touch the lenses) and the bottoms of the frames usually touch my cheeks when I am smiling. :D I never have to think about where to look for the correct focus.

I prefer progressive lenses and DH prefers his trifocals. When asked, my optometrist said that most people prefer the one they wear first. I wonder if that is true. It may be, but I think if I wore fashionably narrow glasses, I might not like progressive lenses as much as I do.
 
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