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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Gwen Hayes said:
My experience with traditional publishing was very different. I did two or three rounds with a very good editor, the same one who acquired my book. Then the copy edits, again very good. And then it was proofread and then it was given to me for proofreading. I didn't feel that any of the steps were missed or not given full weight. And I have not heard any of my author friends not having content edits. Perhaps it's a genre thing?

I know it seems like a lot of people looking at the same thing, but they are three very different skills. Sometimes during copy edits, mistakes get put INTO the manuscript. It happens a lot. You want as many eyes on your book as you can find before you put your name on it and release it into the wild. If you can't afford all three kinds of editors, cultivate as many nit-picky friends as you can to read it over.
Oh, dear. (Since KKR is a Hugo-winning editor in addition to being a well-known writer, her experience probably is different ;) )

I suggest you read what she says more carefully. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Gwen Hayes said:
I didn't mean any disrespect. I was just relaying that my experience included content editing. And that the people I know who are published with traditional houses have had content editing happen on their manuscripts as well.

It is perhaps because she is such a well known writer that maybe they don't feel the need to edit her as much? Or that perhaps different genres work differently in New York.
I suggested re-reading the post because she was very specifically talking about hiring our own editors.

This post had nothing to do with what traditional publishers do.

ETA: She has talked about what to expect from editing with traditional publishers, including what to expect from a content edit, in another recent post. If you want to know what she said about that, go back in her blog a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Gwen Hayes said:
I was referring to this:

"Here's the biggest secret in all of traditional publishing: Most fiction books have never had a true content edit.

From Big Name's fifteenth bestseller, which the acquiring editor (read company president) is afraid to touch for fear of losing Big Name to another company, to Sweet Young Thing's first novel, which no one has the time (or the budget) to edit, most fiction books get little more than a line edit followed by a copyedit.

I would wager 95% of what you read has never had a content edit. Decades ago, writers started complaining that editors didn't "edit" any more, and by that, writers meant that they never got a content edit."


My experience was different. That's all.
I see what you're talking about.

I also had content edits when I was traditionally published, but I am pretty sure (considering the huge number of novels she has published in a number of genres not to mention being an editor) that she knows more than I do about what most publishers do. She doesn't say that no one gets content edits, just most novels.

The complaint about lack of editing is very common.

ETA: As I said, she discussed editing with traditional publishers in some depth recently. This really wasn't about that and that was more of an aside.
 
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