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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody heard of this? I was surprised to learn that Roald Dahl had written a partial manuscript for a third installment of the "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" books (The White House of the title is mentioned at the end of "Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator" and not the abode of the U.S. president). But I can't find any mention of it on the Internet except at the Roald Dahl Museum site (http://www.roalddahlmuseum.org/default.aspx), which supposedly links to the manuscript via bad Flash coding that I can't crack.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's so strange. When I have time I'm going to try to pitch an article about it somewhere and call the Museum to see what's what. It seems weird that Charlie would be such a big international property for multiple generations and for this not to be mentioned in more places. Thanks to those who replied.  :D
 

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I have been to the museum. Roald Dahl has a bunch of stories I never heard of until I went there. Her had a bunch of twisted fairy tales. I would not be suprised he continued the stories. I wonder if it was one he was working on when he passed away.
 

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My daughter would love the answer to this question. She was so sad when she realized that she had read all of Roald Dahl and that, since he is dead, there is no hope of any more.
 

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I loved the Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl.  Quite an interesting spin on some of the old fairytales...and kind of a dark book to find in a 2nd grader's backpack!!  :eek:
 

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Speaking of Roald Dahl, I've had sample of this book on my Kindle for ages. One of these days I'll get around to reading it. It gets very good reviews.



From Amazon: Long before Willy Wonka sent out those five Golden Tickets, Roald Dahl lived a life that was more James Bond than James and the Giant Peach. After blinding headaches cut short his distinguished career as a Royal Air Force fighter pilot, Dahl became part of an elite group of British spies working against the United States' neutrality at the onset of World War II. The Irregulars is a brilliant profile of Dahl's lesser-known profession, embracing a real-life storyline of suave debauchery, clandestine motives, and afternoon cocktails. If this sounds oddly familiar, it's no coincidence: both Ian Fleming (the creator of 007) and Bill Stephenson (the legendary spymaster rumored to be the inspiration for Bond) were members of the same outfit. Although "Dahl...Roald Dahl" doesn't quite carry the same debonair ring, there is no discrediting this fascinating look at the British author's covert service to the Allied cause during WWII. --Dave Callanan
 

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Leslie said:
Speaking of Roald Dahl, I've had sample of this book on my Kindle for ages. One of these days I'll get around to reading it. It gets very good reviews.



From Amazon: Long before Willy Wonka sent out those five Golden Tickets, Roald Dahl lived a life that was more James Bond than James and the Giant Peach. After blinding headaches cut short his distinguished career as a Royal Air Force fighter pilot, Dahl became part of an elite group of British spies working against the United States' neutrality at the onset of World War II. The Irregulars is a brilliant profile of Dahl's lesser-known profession, embracing a real-life storyline of suave debauchery, clandestine motives, and afternoon cocktails. If this sounds oddly familiar, it's no coincidence: both Ian Fleming (the creator of 007) and Bill Stephenson (the legendary spymaster rumored to be the inspiration for Bond) were members of the same outfit. Although "Dahl...Roald Dahl" doesn't quite carry the same debonair ring, there is no discrediting this fascinating look at the British author's covert service to the Allied cause during WWII. --Dave Callanan
I'll have to check that out. I haven't really read any of his "adult" literature, but have read most of the stuff geared for the younger set. I remember when James and the Giant Peach was released as a movie, my son was the same age as the character and we joked that they looked so much alike. Big head, short dirty blonde hair and big eyes! :)
 

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Leslie said:
Speaking of Roald Dahl, I've had sample of this book on my Kindle for ages. One of these days I'll get around to reading it. It gets very good reviews.



From Amazon: Long before Willy Wonka sent out those five Golden Tickets, Roald Dahl lived a life that was more James Bond than James and the Giant Peach. After blinding headaches cut short his distinguished career as a Royal Air Force fighter pilot, Dahl became part of an elite group of British spies working against the United States' neutrality at the onset of World War II. The Irregulars is a brilliant profile of Dahl's lesser-known profession, embracing a real-life storyline of suave debauchery, clandestine motives, and afternoon cocktails. If this sounds oddly familiar, it's no coincidence: both Ian Fleming (the creator of 007) and Bill Stephenson (the legendary spymaster rumored to be the inspiration for Bond) were members of the same outfit. Although "Dahl...Roald Dahl" doesn't quite carry the same debonair ring, there is no discrediting this fascinating look at the British author's covert service to the Allied cause during WWII. --Dave Callanan
Oh Leslie, that looks good! Thanks. I just sent a sample to myself.

Melissa
 

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Leslie said:
Speaking of Roald Dahl, I've had sample of this book on my Kindle for ages. One of these days I'll get around to reading it. It gets very good reviews.



From Amazon: Long before Willy Wonka sent out those five Golden Tickets, Roald Dahl lived a life that was more James Bond than James and the Giant Peach. After blinding headaches cut short his distinguished career as a Royal Air Force fighter pilot, Dahl became part of an elite group of British spies working against the United States' neutrality at the onset of World War II. The Irregulars is a brilliant profile of Dahl's lesser-known profession, embracing a real-life storyline of suave debauchery, clandestine motives, and afternoon cocktails. If this sounds oddly familiar, it's no coincidence: both Ian Fleming (the creator of 007) and Bill Stephenson (the legendary spymaster rumored to be the inspiration for Bond) were members of the same outfit. Although "Dahl...Roald Dahl" doesn't quite carry the same debonair ring, there is no discrediting this fascinating look at the British author's covert service to the Allied cause during WWII. --Dave Callanan
I have had that book in my wish list even before I got my Kindle, I am just hoping the price will come down just a little....soon, please
 

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Kindle Convert said:
I loved the Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl. Quite an interesting spin on some of the old fairytales...and kind of a dark book to find in a 2nd grader's backpack!! :eek:
My almost seven year old LOVES Revolting Rhymes. We've had to talk a bit about what we don't recite at the grocery store.

I keep waiting for The Irregulars to come down in price, too.
 

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KMA said:
My almost seven year old LOVES Revolting Rhymes. We've had to talk a bit about what we don't recite at the grocery store.
Yeah...I wish it was available in K format...I'd buy it! They're amusing, but I'd see why you don't want you DD reciting them to just anyone! LOL!!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ha! I had "The Irregulars" in my Kindle 1 samples too. I also still have my original copy of "Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator," which is a weird and to the best of my recollection sub-standard sequel for the most part.
 
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