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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now that I've dropped out of Select, I'm just noticing that the Japan and Brazil stores are following the pattern set with India: you have to be enrolled in Select in order to get the 70% royalty. Not much of an issue for me, for the time being -- I haven't sold a single book in Japan or Brazil. But I'm wondering how many other Amazon stores are going to follow this pattern.

There's no other simple way for us to access these markets, so Amazon can set whatever terms it likes. (Which is not the case with the Canadian market; perhaps that's why 70% is accessible for those outside Select in the new .ca store.) But however understandable it is from a business angle, I do find it intensely annoying.
 

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Sigh . . . I know what you mean. I always assumed most of my sales came from the US, but then I left Select and found out otherwise. It's really annoying.
 

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More annoying, for now, is that Australians and readers from many other nationalities have to pay $2 extra on the price of your book. Now, if your book is priced low, that is a hefty additional fee.
 

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I'm Australian and enrolled in Select, but I sold a book in Japan and only got 35%. I'm presuming it's because it's classed as a 'foreign' sale, just as Australian sales through Amazon.com are classed as 'foreign' sales to us. Makes no sense whatsoever. Or maybe I need to email them and ask why?

Not that I'll ever get the money. We have to earn a huge amount before they will pay us, too.
 

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Richardcrasta said:
More annoying, for now, is that Australians and readers from many other nationalities have to pay $2 extra on the price of your book. Now, if your book is priced low, that is a hefty additional fee.
Australians don't pay extra to buy a kindle book. Some European and other nationalities do, but I forget which ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Skate said:
I'm Australian and enrolled in Select, but I sold a book in Japan and only got 35%. I'm presuming it's because it's classed as a 'foreign' sale, just as Australian sales through Amazon.com are classed as 'foreign' sales to us. Makes no sense whatsoever. Or maybe I need to email them and ask why?
That's weird. Maybe the reader was buying from the .jp store but lived elsewhere?

Sent from my LG-VS700 using Tapatalk 2
 
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Actually, it wouldn't surprise me if Amazon eventually tries to push everyone into Select with that being the only way to get the 70%. I can see them setting up a three tier system: 70% for select, 50% for non-select above $2.99, at 35% for everyone else. I think they would continue to offer a slightly higher rate for books above $2.99 because the $2.99-$9.99 price range seems to be the sweet spot Amazon prefers. But I'm fully assuming they will eventually stop offering 70% across the board.
 

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Bards and Sages (Julie) said:
But I'm fully assuming they will eventually stop offering 70% across the board.
But wouldn't that just drive everyone to the other sellers who pay higher royalties?
They'd have to offer some further incentive to Select authors to stay in and right now they don't, other than KOLL.
 

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Quiss said:
They'd have to offer some further incentive to Select authors to stay in and right now they don't, other than KOLL.
I think (and I think Julie agrees -- although I hope we're both wrong) that eventually the further incentive to be in Select is that Select will be the only way to get 70% royalties...including in the US and the UK, which is where the bulk of most folks' royalties come from.
 

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CJArcher said:
Australians don't pay extra to buy a kindle book. Some European and other nationalities do, but I forget which ones.
French do, when i get a book for my daughter who has a France registered kindle I pay an extra fee
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quiss said:
But wouldn't that just drive everyone to the other sellers who pay higher royalties?
They'd have to offer some further incentive to Select authors to stay in and right now they don't, other than KOLL.
If B&N goes under, Amazon's slice of the ereader/tablet market will be vast. I don't think most of us will be in a position to demand Kindle users mosey on over to Smashwords to get their mobi files.

I tend to agree with Julie, here, though the PR backlash from that kind of move might make them think twice.
 
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Quiss said:
But wouldn't that just drive everyone to the other sellers who pay higher royalties?
They'd have to offer some further incentive to Select authors to stay in and right now they don't, other than KOLL.
Of course not.

1. Folks like me who sell most of our stuff elsewhere would still keep our books on Amazon, even at the lower rate, because we would want to have a continued presence on Amazon. In fact, when my books were listed through Mobipocket, I was getting 50% across the board. When Amazon closed Mobipocket, they forced everyone into Select because at the time they were refusing to work with any of the other digital distribution services. At the time, they weren't even TALKING to SW and they were giving Lulu a hard time from what I understand (from those who use Lulu that still talk to me lol) and they were closing rank against some of the other services as well.

2. Folks who don't sell that much off of Amazon would simply go into Select to keep their 70% because that is the only way they know how to sell anyway. If you only sell three or four books a month on SW or BN or iTunes, it doesn't matter if they offer you 70%-80%-or even 90% royalty. if the majority of your sales are driven by Amazon, you either have to stay with Amazon or figure out how to get the same volume through another outlet. THAT is a scary concept to a lot of people.

3. Folks who sell a little bit everywhere would still sell on Amazon at the lower rate because they would want to keep the presence. Because even if you make less per sale, 50% per sale is still better than zero.
 

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Somewhat off-topic.

Why on earth doesn't Amazon sell books in ePub format? 
You would think that this would greatly encourage Kobo, Nook and Sony readers to buy their reads at Amazon.
From what I've read, Amazon doesn't make money on their hardware (but perhaps I'm wrong there)

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Quiss said:
Somewhat off-topic.

Why on earth doesn't Amazon sell books in ePub format?
You would think that this would greatly encourage Kobo, Nook and Sony readers to buy their reads at Amazon.
From what I've read, Amazon doesn't make money on their hardware (but perhaps I'm wrong there)
Because it would work both ways: Kindle owners would be able to buy their reads at B&N, Kobo, and all the other places that offer epubs. Having a proprietary format is totally in your favor if you dominate the market the way Amazon does. You just lock everyone in more and more to exclusive use of your site and your devices.

ETA: And to your publishing platform, too. :-\
 
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Becca Mills said:
I tend to agree with *****, here, though the PR backlash from that kind of move might make them think twice.
Unfortunately, I don't think there would be a backlash because they are already doing it. It's called creeping. Amazon is subtle with its changes. First they create Select simply as a way to get exclusive content by offering the the borrowing money pool. Then they open up the India market, at give a convoluted reason why "at this time" only Select authors get the 70%. Nobody batted an eyelash. Now they creep further by only making the 70% available to Select authors for a few other places. Nobody bats an eyelash.

Once people have become conditioned to that, they will "streamline" their KDP program. My guess is that it would be presented as their Select program for exclusive authors (70% across the board, free days, the lending library pool). Then a wholesale program in line with normal wholesale pricing (possibly including the elimination of the delivery fee, as it originated with the need to pay for the free Whispernet service (which is not supported on the newest generation). I suspect the 50% royalty would be more like how wholesale programs work, with 50% being paid off of the list price and not the sale price (as they did when they used Mobipocket). That would be the way to 'sell' the lower royalty to people and still look like a hero. And it would also free them up to discount indie books however they wanted. And with their recent crackdowns on indies trying to artificially force Amazon to Price match, the actual risk would be nominal for them.

Also, much like Apple can do no wrong, Amazon has enough fanboys to shield it from any real backlash. Anyone who makes too much of a stink would be shouted down as "not appreciating the opportunity" or whatever.
 

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"But wouldn't that just drive everyone to the other sellers who pay higher royalties? "
I expect people would deploy their books in the retail spread that gives them the most money.
 
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