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A lot of threads and posts lately on short stories and whether there is room for them on Amazon Kindle...

The new Will Ferrell movie, Everything Must Go, is based on the short story, Why Don't You Dance, by the late, great Raymond Carver. The story appears in the collections What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, Where I'm Calling From, and Raymond Carver: Collected Stories.

The short story was nearly dead in America when Carver pretty much single-handedly revived it.

Unfortunately, Carver's works are not yet ebooks, and I'm not sure why.

If you're passionate about the modern American short story, I urge you to visit Carver's Amazon book pages and click the link titled "Tell the Publisher! I'd like to read this book on Kindle."

Meantime, read DTB editions of Raymond Carver wherever you find them. He will not disappoint.

 

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Not sure why the reading public isn't more interested in shorts and/or novellas. Some of my favorite works fall into those categories - the Nick Adams stories by Hemingway, for example.

Nathan Bransford did a recent poll about this subject. People primarily want novels and if they're going to buy short stories, they better by in an anthology.
 

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Raymond Carver is one of the immortals.

The echo of his work is in so much of modern story telling.

I read once that his editor tried to take credit/partial or otherwise for much of his work.

It made me love one of his last poems even more.

Late Fragment

And did you get what
you wanted from this life, even so?
I did.
And what did you want?
To call myself beloved, to feel myself
beloved on the earth
 

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I love Carver.

You would struggle to find a wasted word in much of his work. His long-time editor, Gordon Lish, worked with some of the biggest names: Ken Kesey, Neil Cassady, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Don DeLillo, T.C. Boyle, as well as Nabakov and Kundera.

Carver's prose would not have been the same without Lish's input. And if you want to see this for yourself, The New Yorker published Carver's original draft of his famous story What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, with his editors corrections visible. I recommend you all to read it, in full, and when you do, you will see that Lish's contribution is huge. He even came up with the title (it was originally called Beginners - not quite as catchy).

http://www.newyorker.com/online/2007/12/24/071224on_onlineonly_carver?currentPage=1

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
dgaughran said:
I love Carver.

You would struggle to find a wasted word in much of his work. His long-time editor, Gordon Lish, worked with some of the biggest names: Ken Kesey, Neil Cassady, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Don DeLillo, T.C. Boyle, as well as Nabakov and Kundera.

Carver's prose would not have been the same without Lish's input. And if you want to see this for yourself, The New Yorker published Carver's original draft of his famous story What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, with his editors corrections visible. I recommend you all to read it, in full, and when you do, you will see that Lish's contribution is huge. He even came up with the title (it was originally called Beginners - not quite as catchy).

http://www.newyorker.com/online/2007/12/24/071224on_onlineonly_carver?currentPage=1

Dave
Gordon Lish was largely responsible for Raymond Carver's early reputation as a "minimalist." (For a complete picture of Lish's editing impact, see The Library of America's volume "Raymond Carver: Collected Stories," which includes RC's original manuscript for the 17 stories that make up "What We Talk About When We Talk About Love." The original is 202 pages. After Lish's edit, it became 103.) Yet Carver ultimately rejected the minimalist label, as well as Lish. Carver's exquisite later, longer, fuller works, published in the New Yorker, required "minimal" editing, according to his New Yorker editor Charles McGrath.

Lish tried to take credit for much of Raymond Carver's career. But as time goes by, Carver's stock will rise, and Lish's will fall.

As Carver's first wife Maryann said: "Ray was no child pitted against Gordon's Svengali presence. He liked Gordon and felt sorry for him, because, as the saying went, Gordon would have given his left ball to have the talent to write the way Ray could. Ray was the original and Gordon could only hack away at and change what Ray put on paper."
 
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