Kindle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,329 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been telling my husband for years that he has it and that it's a real problem. He's always ignored me or made vague promises about getting it checked out. I got my own room a long time ago because who can sleep when they're holding their own breath and waiting for a spouse to resume breathing? Anyhow, he finally went for a sleep test a few weeks ago and the guy conducting it said, "Oh, yeah, something has to be done." We got the results the other day, and he stops breathing up to 30 times an hour and often in excess of 40 seconds at a time. Apparently 3 times an hour is enough for them to do something.

It looks like he'll have to do a tank that will essentially force him to breath and I'm quite relieved that he's finally getting this done. I think that until the guy conducting the tests made it clear that he saw an issue, that my husband thought I was exaggerating. I think the actual results knocked him on his rear. Maybe I can do a few more sleepovers, instead of, um, leaving for "my own place."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,664 Posts
My mother was diagnosed with this back in November.  She was prescribed a CPAP machine that rhythmically forces air into her throat and opens the airway at night.  It REALLY helped at first.  Now after the initial "high", it isn't as miraculous, but it still helps give her more energy, and she keeps wearing it, even though she hates the way it looks (that's very important to my mother).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,476 Posts
My husband has gone through the sleep study twice, has been told how bad his sleep apnea is, been prescribed the CPAP machine, and still refuses to do anything about it.  Hope you have better luck than I did.  Sigh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,329 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My husband has 10 lbs to lose, tops. I suppose it could make a difference, but he's naturally lean.

He seems committed to this -- CPAP is right -- and we'll see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,515 Posts
spotsmom said:
My husband has gone through the sleep study twice, has been told how bad his sleep apnea is, been prescribed the CPAP machine, and still refuses to do anything about it. Hope you have better luck than I did. Sigh.
I'm right there with ya SM.. Mine is OK sleeping with a pillow over his face with his arm thrown over it to hold it there, but heavens forbid someone put that CPAP machine near him...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
my dad has been using his CPAP machine for around 15 yrs.  It took a while for him (and mom) to get used to it, but it was well worth it.  When dad was tested, no one had really heard about sleep apnea and he had to drive to Lexington, KY (the nearest "big" city) for the test.  When he was getting the results, he was told by the tester he was amazed that he was still alive.  It was putting a lot of pressure on his body.  Dad still has to go in every so often to be retested (w/ his machine) b/c it has to be recalibrated for him.  He ususally knows when it's time to go back when he wakes up tired (or mom complains that he's snoring again). 

Sometimes the machines can dry out the sinus', and they have an attachement where you put water in a container on the machine and it acts like a humidifier. 

One thing I would suggest is to get a generator if you can.  My parents have never gotten one and every time the power has gone out, my dad has been miserable.  He's had to sleep sitting up and feels tired and like you do when you don't get a good night's sleep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,212 Posts
When DH was tested, the testers had to extend the test time a couple hours because DH had developed the unconsious habit of waking himself up and he rarely made it to the deep sleep state that they needed to check. The last hour or so of the test where they put him on a CPAP machine resulted in him getting more rest than he normally got in a few days. That part of the test convinced DH that using the CPAP machine was definitely worth it. The new machines are very quiet and easy to use. His machine has the attachment for holding water and raising the humidity. Living in Arizona, that has also helped. ;D The machine came with a case so that it is easy to take on vacations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
I got a CPAP machine around four or five years ago. It's hard going at first but you do get used to it, and it will make a big difference. My wife loves it; she doesn't have to put up with my snoring and breathing-breaks anymore!

I too went to see about it because of my wife's concerns. It isn't necessarily something you notice yourself until the lack of sleep starts to interfere with your ability to cope with your daily life, driving, concentrating; falling asleep at the drop of a hat… it can get bad, and cause serious health problems.

CaedemMarquez said:
I've heard weight can have a lot to do with it.
It can be a major factor, but not always.

I've apparently had it for years before I was diagnosed, and was technically underweight for years… not now though, now I could do with loosing a few pounds :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,566 Posts
The Spouse Thingy has been on a CPAP for several years now, and if you try to take it away he'll probably bite you... His snoring was really bad, enough that we retreated to separate rooms because I wasn't sleeping and it was starting to affect my health. He underwent a couple of different surgeries to no avail, and finally got the sleep study done... He was waking 50-60 times an hour and had apnea episodes.

A couple weeks on the CPAP and he was amazed at how well HE felt.

Even with weight loss, he snores. He'll probably be on the CPAP forever, which he's fine with. He's used to it. Plus, his needing a medical device gives us a break on our power bill, so there's that :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
I never paid much attention to sleep apnea, but recently started working at a dental lab and they make a couple of devices FDA approved for it. I don't think they are as effective as CPAP, but are more likely to be used, since they are small things you put in your mouth, nothing mechanical. They are called EMA and TAP.
My sister just went through a sleep study, but I don't think she was able to sleep at all, so will probably have to do it over again. Sleep studies have become so common that now they have a two year degree you can get, "polysomnographer"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,438 Posts
I have Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), the most common form. Overweight males typically have this, but you don't have to be fat to suffer from it.
I've had my CPAP machine for around 12 years now. I've dropped 85 pounds since fist being diagnosed, but I still need my machine.
For me, the first night was the worst. After that, I would almost fight anyone who tried to take it away. I was starting to fall asleep while driving is what made me go to the sleep center to be diagnosed. That and the fact neighbors could hear my snoring.
A good night's sleep is a wonderful thing. If anyone needs a CPAP machine, make sure the doctor that writes the prescription includes a "Heated Humidifier" on the prescription. Makes a world of difference.
Best of luck in getting your husband to use the equipment!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,329 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
We picked up his machine today. Has the humidifier. And a memory card so our insurance knows if he's using it for realz.  :)
 
G

·
I hope he begins to feel better, and I'm glad you got him to get it checked out.

I'm actually pretty chronically tired, and so I had a sleep test done a few weeks ago too. I got the results back, but I had barely any condition at all and my doctor just told me to take vitamins. I kind of wish I could try the machine just to see if it would make me feel more rested.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top