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It's been a while since this topic came up (http://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,176284.msg2487034.html) (a 2014 thread)

But I was wondering if anyone has tried this, or changed their stance on it.

More and more, our peers in self-publishing keep repeating to treat your writing like a business, doesn't seem so far out to me. Some good reasons to not go that route in the old thread above, but again, just wondering where we stand on the subject today, in 2017.
 

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I'd be shocked to find a bank willing to make a loan on the financials of running a self-pub business unless the author was already successful at doing so.
 
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Regardless of the type of business you have, a business loan should really only be for initial start-up costs or expansion. If I open a pizza shop, I need a lot of capital to buy equipment, deposits on a lease, initial hiring expenses, etc. But once the business is up and running, I shouldn't need a loan to cover the cost of flour, sauce, and paper plates or my employee wages. Those costs should be handled as part of my normal overhead and paid for out of sales.

Self-publishing has next to no up front costs. You don't need an expensive computer or expensive software. You don't need a dedicated office. Your costs are your basic overhead: electricity to run your computer, internet connection, cost of cover art, editing, advertising, the occasional consult with an attorney to discuss copyright issues or review a contract. ALL OF WHICH should be covered by your revenue. If you aren't making enough sales to cover your costs, you need to reexamine your business plan before thinking about a loan. In fact, the bank would no doubt require a formal business plan.
 

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CEMartin2 said:
It's been a while since this topic came up (http://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,176284.msg2487034.html) (a 2014 thread)

But I was wondering if anyone has tried this, or changed their stance on it.

More and more, our peers in self-publishing keep repeating to treat your writing like a business, doesn't seem so far out to me. Some good reasons to not go that route in the old thread above, but again, just wondering where we stand on the subject today, in 2017.
I think a loan is a legitimate approach for an indie writer -- IF you have a viable business model and have a specific reason for the money besides propping up failing sales.

If you've got a solid business but want to front some marketing, for instance, a small microloan of $5K or $10K might be in order. SBA offers them through microloan intermediaries. But also check with your bank. They may offer "instant" working capital loans based on your banking history.

However, as others here have suggested, you need a solid business reason that makes sense. Don't expect a loan to provide living expenses or make up for poor sales. That will get you into a world of hurt you're better off without.
 

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Personally, I'd rather get an evening job or something for a few months and have that as dedicated publishing cash.
 

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Congratulations if you're self-employed, whether as a professional juggler or a career freelance writer. PPP loans are designed just for folks like you. Grants are available from the government for a variety of educational programs, so if your book serves a purpose that furthers a cause, there's a chance you'll be able to find one. If don't manage to get a grant, you can apply for a business loan, uplyftcapital.com is always up to help people with business ideas which don't have money to start.
 

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My take would be that if you're treating it as a business, by the time you reached expenses that would justify needing a loan, it's obvious that the business isn't succeeding. There's virtually no start up here. You can get an income rolling with a $50 premade cover and a basic ebook converted with Calibre.
 
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