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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Though self-published books often tout a stigma of unprofessionalism that sticks out more than the actual story (which is very unfortunate), every now and then one ascends above that and shines.

"The Ghosts of Varner Creek," by Michael Weems, is one of those books. It's not that it's written and edited perfectly, because it isn't. However, the grammatical errors and out-of-place words here and there are easily overlooked by the emotion that emanates from the mind of the main character, Sol. And since much of the book is recounted from the uncomplicated thoughts of a poor farm boy, these errors often fit right into the narration anyway. Sol is a naïve youngster in an unsophisticated world, but his nurturing maturity and wittiness make him extremely lovable.

It's the story of a father's domestic abuse and alcoholism, woven around the lives of hardworking, traditional folk. It's about unfinished business, truth, and rectitude, all pointing to the ghosts in Sol's world. The story was quite engaging and thought provoking. I highly recommend it to anyone desiring a quick, interesting read.
 

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I started this book, but honestly, had to put it down. I didn't feel the emotion that you talked about. I wasn't even put off by the grammatical errors or editing that you mentioned, it was the painfully long, inexplicable backstory. I did not find it to be a good example of self-publishing, sadly.
At least you liked it though. The nice thing about self pubbing is that there is something for everyone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
HezBa said:
I started this book, but honestly, had to put it down. I didn't feel the emotion that you talked about. I wasn't even put off by the grammatical errors or editing that you mentioned, it was the painfully long, inexplicable backstory. I did not find it to be a good example of self-publishing, sadly.
At least you liked it though. The nice thing about self pubbing is that there is something for everyone.
Bad grammar and editing issues turn me off a lot. Most of the time I'll just delete the book immediately after seeing a few, but I stayed with this one. This is one of those stories that some people just don't get, in my opinion.

Though many people are put off by backstory, it doesn't usually bother me. In fact, I like it more often than not. It's necessary in many situations, merely to catch the reader up to where the actualy story begins. One book loaded with backstory that comes to mind is Richard Russo's 'Bridge of Sighs.' It's continuous throughout. I loved it.
 
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