Kindle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 169 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Actually I should meet several penguins. I'm on a cruise ship headed to Antarctica! We've puttered around the Strait of Magellan for a few days after boarding in Punta Aerenas, Chile. This morning we landed at Cape Horn. This is mainly a bragging rights destination there is a little too see there. Just the world's southernmost lighthouse, a crude chapel, and some grassy cliffs. Because of the high winds and cold temperatures, only short plants such as grass will grow. I'm going to try to post a pic or two on this slow cruise ship wifi, here goes!







Looks like that worked, you see me standing next to the marker for the Cape (the cutout is an albatross, supposedly life size), the chapel interior, and a shot of our Zodiac pulling away from the ship. I'll try posting more later if this works out!

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Temperatures have been in the upper 30s and lower 40s.. I'm told in Antarctica it will be around freezing. We will spend two days landing in the south Shetland Islands off the Antarctic coast, and four days on the Antarctic peninsula. Getting from Cape Horn to the south Shetland Islands will take about 36 hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Here are a couple of shots from Garibaldi Glacier in Southern Chile. We were there two days ago.







It was raining a bit, but not badly. The experience reminded me of being in Alaska.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
Very cool!
DH & I would love to do a trip at the other end of the world to see polar bears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Oh, and here is the world's most southern lighthouse , at Cape Horn. A Chilean Navy officer and his wife are stationed here for a year at a time....



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
We are at sea now, I'm told about halfway between Cape Horn and Antarctica. We have a gale force winds, and the ship is rocking a bit. The crew claims this is a better than average passage. For yesterday we were in a small place called Puerto Williams. One Thing I have learned on this trip is that Cape Horn is not where I thought it was. It is not the tip of the island of Tierra del Fuego, but actually on some islands off the coast there.

I'm going to post a couple of photos from Puerto Williams. Note the Christmas tree! PW is not a major cruise destination however. Speaking of which, we've only seen one other cruise ship in several days down here. Very different from the Mediterranean.





Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,822 Posts
Oh Claw !!

You are taking my dream trip......Have fun and enjoy it enough for both of us !!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
63,461 Posts
Yay, Claw!!!!

We have friends who took that trip and they had a very rocky passage--and were told that it was about normal.  Glad you're having a better one!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
63,461 Posts
Your post made me look up Cape Horn. Read this on Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Horn:

"Cape Horn (Dutch: About this sound Kaap Hoorn , Spanish: Cabo de Hornos), named after the city of Hoorn in the Netherlands, is the southernmost headland of the Tierra del Fuego archipelago of southern Chile, and is located on the small Hornos Island. Although not the most southerly point of South America (which are the Diego Ramirez Islands), Cape Horn marks the northern boundary of the Drake Passage and marks where the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans collide"

And this map:


Very interesting, I also thought it was the most southerly bit.

Betsy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,676 Posts
Betsy the Quilter said:
Your post made me look up Cape Horn. Read this on Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Horn:

"Cape Horn (Dutch: About this sound Kaap Hoorn , Spanish: Cabo de Hornos), named after the city of Hoorn in the Netherlands, is the southernmost headland of the Tierra del Fuego archipelago of southern Chile, and is located on the small Hornos Island. Although not the most southerly point of South America (which are the Diego Ramirez Islands), Cape Horn marks the northern boundary of the Drake Passage and marks where the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans collide"

And this map:


Very interesting, I also thought it was the most southerly bit.

Betsy
As did I and I'll bet the majority of people, too.

What a great trip. Love the photos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Oh, I bought another Internet pass tonight. I'm having a great trip, we have now made three landings, two on islands off the coast of the continent and one on the actual main continent. One of the island landings was inside the caldera of a volcano that Errupted as recently as 1970! This evening after dinner, I went out and watched and saw a beautiful blue icebergs, and seals and penguins diving as if if they were in a circus.

Temperatures have not been bad. As forecast, they are usually around freezing.  Usually over dressed and come back soaked in sweat. I'm sure it helped that two of the landings involved a great deal of climbing. Today we went cruising around in the zodiacs after landing, and that is actually the coldest I've got. Going to try and post some pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #12












Got a lot of photographs of this guy who would dive off the berg, and moments later pop back up! Despite his name, they feed mostly on krill not crabs. The wildlife on the trip has been great, we seen most everything we wanted or expected to see except whales. Last night we did have three humpback whale put on a pretty good show. But no other whales. We had hopes of seeing orcas, or a blue whale if we were very lucky. Course the trip is not over yet. Also I have not seen an albatross yet, which I suppose is good luck.

This is a crabeater seal diving. Penguins coming up in another Post!

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #13




Above are penguins. These are chinstrap penguins. They are one of the smallest varieties. You have to follow a path sent out by the Guides, you cannot wander at will. But they set up a path right through the penguin colony. And this seems to be standard. We saw evidence that other people have been there. But we have only seen one other cruise ship (actually it was the only ship) in Antarctica. It's not a heavily-traveled destination! They do tell us that about 40,000 people a year travel here. And yes, that is an egg you see under the penguin. Then penguins only play one egg per season, a few lay two eggs, but usually deliberately push one out of the nest when the other is about to hatch. pictures were taken at a place called half Moon Island

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
In the picture of people on a rocky outcrop, the small black and white things are chinstrap penguins. To the far right, you can see a skua (hawklike bird) perched on a boulder waiting for a chance to steal an egg.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
63,461 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
63,461 Posts
crebel said:
The "chinstrap" makes the beak look like a nose and the strap is a smile - adorable.
I love the picture of the chinstrap penguin. So cool!

Betsy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #19






There are several optional activities. One of them is kayaking. They will even teach you kayaking if you haven't done it before. I did not sign up. But one penguin seemed to want to try.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
63,461 Posts
The Hooded Claw said:


There are several optional activities. One of them is kayaking. They will even teach you kayaking if you haven't done it before. I did not sign up. But one penguin seemed to want to try.
Love it!

Betsy
 
1 - 20 of 169 Posts
Top