Kindle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
Thanks for posting that link.  It was a well written, thought provoking column.

I have some "meaningful, scintillating material" on my Kindle, but I also have some of the free romance novels that would probably fit in the "insipid" category.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
What a totally lovely article.  Thank you very much for sharing it with us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
Thank you I enjoyed reading that article.

I never put alot of thought into the name "Kindle" he makes great points.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
67,287 Posts
That was a very good article. . . . .I'm pretty sure my Kindle contains everything from the sublime to the ridiculous, as they say.  Just like life.  :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
I as well would love to know the marketing process behind calling it the "Kindle". Obviously the most successful technology brand names end up being verbs. We xerox something, google it, twitter it, etc. I bet someone, somewhere, ran through a few hundred words as verbs (and of course, the Kindle benefits from being a verb) to see how well they work in conversational usage. I don't really think of "kindling" something when I use the device or download a book, but I can see how the language could evolve should the device take off. Plus the word "Kindle" is much catchier, warmer, and face it, CUTER, than if the name was the "Amazon E-reader AMZ-02". The DX suffers a little from this, but it is still a Kindle first, souless acronym second :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
67,287 Posts
I think Jeff Bezos did once explain that "kindle" was meant to invoke the idea of kindling a love of reading in more people.  And I do think the word will be appropriated for common usage:  "Do you have a Kindle?"  "Yeah, mine's a Sony."  :D 
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,578 Posts
Wow, I never thought my Kindle related to the mysteries of the world!  I'm starting to think that inside my little black Amazon leather cover is the meaning of life.

Seriously, it was a great article.  It got me thinking about a lot of things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,981 Posts
When I first saw this topic I thought that the blog would be trying to figure out if an Orthodox Jew can use the Kindle on the Sabbath. It's not but I still am wondering about e-book readers and the Sabbath. My guess is that you cannot use the Kindle on the Sabbath because it is electronic and turning the page requires the use of electricity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
Yeah, but if the battery was charged BEFORE the Sabbath, then technically all the "work" has already been done, right?

I had no idea they couldn't use electricity, really?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
Bwahaha. I'm sorry, but I found the title of this thread totally hilarious.  I imagined this would be somehow about Jewish man marrying a jewish girl, and the relation of Kindle in helping that happen  ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,981 Posts
I could be wrong about that. I know a family that removes the light bulb from their fridge before the sabbath so that when it is opened there is no light shining out of it. Then again, the fridge uses electricity. It was a random thought that I had in regards when I first saw the topic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
ProfCrash said:
I could be wrong about that. I know a family that removes the light bulb from their fridge before the sabbath so that when it is opened there is no light shining out of it. Then again, the fridge uses electricity. It was a random thought that I had in regards when I first saw the topic.
The refrigerator is on. That's fine. Any lights that are turned on before Shabbat starts (or, any oven turned onto warm, or any other electric thingy turned on) can stay on the whole time. It just can't be turned off and back on. This is why meals like cholent and other types of stew became popular Jewish meals for Shabbat! Slow cooking :) But back to the fridge, the light is off when the door is closed, and turns on when it is opened - so if the observant Jew opens the door on Shabbat, he or she is doing work (turning on the light, which counts as work, which is forbidden).

My standard Maytag refrigerator, which I bought from a regular appliance store with no special options, has a "sabbath mode," and so did my GE Profile that I had before. You can read about GE's sabbath mode here:

http://www.geconsumerproducts.com/pressroom/press_releases/appliances/ge_monogram/sabmode_refrig.htm
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
67,287 Posts
That's interesting, webhill. . . .so, to go back to the question. . . .can you read a Kindle on the Sabbath?  Can you read a paper book on the Sabbath?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
As I understand it, you can read from the Torah on the sabbath, (of course), but you cannot take notes. The problem with reading the Kindle is that you would be turning it on by taking it out of sleep mode, which is forbidden. As a side note: in large cities (such as New York) with a large orthodox population, a "goy" could make a living by turning lights off for Jewish clients at an appointed hour on Friday night. Before that, you would just let the candle or the oil lamp run out, then go to bed. I don't think this is prevalent now, but in the early 20th century, with the advent of electric illumination, it was done. Of course, it would need to be a trusted goyim and not just a stranger with access to your home. I really do not know the orthodox answer to the use of mechanical timers to turn lights on and off. But the Kindle, applying the parallel, would be forbidden.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
That's a really great article, thanks for sharing it with us. It's nice to see something different every now and again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
Ann in Arlington said:
That's interesting, webhill. . . .so, to go back to the question. . . .can you read a Kindle on the Sabbath? Can you read a paper book on the Sabbath?
That's probably going to depend on the interpretation of a particular rabbi :)
I mean, when you reach the level of observance where you're talking about this type of detail, you usually consult with your rabbi about things like this, and it's definitely NOT the case that if you ask ten rabbis the same question, you will get the same answer from each. You will probably get six or seven different answers and three or four followup questions :). All of that said, some guy has raised the subject here:
http://www.fonerbooks.com/2008/11/google-ebooks-in-print-or-sabbath.html
with the suggestion of writing a program to wake the Kindle up before Shabbat, or something like that ;)
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top