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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon, March 27-29. 4+ stars. Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.

US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

"Morgan has written a book that is highly original and beautifully executed. The balance between the Roman world and the modern world is maintained with skill and adroitness, and the narrative is deftly woven through both of these time periods, never faltering or losing momentum.

The Last Stoic is a fascinating, parallel look at two societies who are not, as it turns out, as different or distinct as one might think."

- Helen Humphreys

** Long-listed for the 2012 ReLit Award for Fiction.**

The Last Stoic is a story of appetite and fear, both modern and ancient. Half of the story's narrative occurs in the time and place of the ancient Roman Empire; the other half occurs in the present-day United States. The parallels between the two eras are so strong that the narrative continues uninterrupted as the setting shifts from historic Rome to modern America, alternating from chapter to chapter.

Marcus, a young man from a northern provincial border town, journeys deep into the heart of the empire and witnesses first-hand the excesses that can lead to ruin, both personal and political. His story offers an ancient commentary on the preoccupations of our own turbulent times. Shortly after his arrival, the empire is thrown into a panic by an unprecedented barbarian attack on the capital. Suspicion and paranoia abound. A young Roman/American runaway named Patrick, disillusioned with his own life and the state of his country, becomes convinced that Marcus is a dangerous traitor. Culminating in a public accusation made by Patrick, Marcus is wrongfully imprisoned, exiled and tortured as an enemy of the state. In prison, he confronts the many contradictions he has found in his adopted home, and in himself.

Throughout the story, in both eras, the writings of the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius (The Meditations) insinuate themselves unexpectedly into Marcus' life. In prison, he is saved by a chance meeting with Sextus Condianus, the "last Stoic" of the title, a cell-mate who is able to fully recite Aurelius' words and impart their wisdom. Ultimately, it is this unanticipated and unbidden instruction that gives the young man the strength he requires to survive. It becomes evident that the words of the venerable Stoic emperor have as much relevance to our own era as they did to his.
 

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Welcome to KBoards, and congratulations on the book! :)

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--Please bookmark this thread (using your browser's bookmark/favorite function) so you can update it as we ask that authors have only one thread per book and add to it when there is more information. You may start a separate thread for each book (or you may have one thread per series of books, or one thread for all of your books, it's your choice).

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·


The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon, June 25-26. 4+ stars. Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.

US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

"Morgan has written a book that is highly original and beautifully executed. The balance between the Roman world and the modern world is maintained with skill and adroitness, and the narrative is deftly woven through both of these time periods, never faltering or losing momentum.

The Last Stoic is a fascinating, parallel look at two societies who are not, as it turns out, as different or distinct as one might think."

- Helen Humphreys

** Long-listed for the 2012 ReLit Award for Fiction.**

The Last Stoic is a story of appetite and fear, both modern and ancient. Half of the story's narrative occurs in the time and place of the ancient Roman Empire; the other half occurs in the present-day United States. The parallels between the two eras are so strong that the narrative continues uninterrupted as the setting shifts from historic Rome to modern America, alternating from chapter to chapter.

Marcus, a young man from a northern provincial border town, journeys deep into the heart of the empire and witnesses first-hand the excesses that can lead to ruin, both personal and political. His story offers an ancient commentary on the preoccupations of our own turbulent times. Shortly after his arrival, the empire is thrown into a panic by an unprecedented barbarian attack on the capital. Suspicion and paranoia abound. A young Roman/American runaway named Patrick, disillusioned with his own life and the state of his country, becomes convinced that Marcus is a dangerous traitor. Culminating in a public accusation made by Patrick, Marcus is wrongfully imprisoned, exiled and tortured as an enemy of the state. In prison, he confronts the many contradictions he has found in his adopted home, and in himself.

Throughout the story, in both eras, the writings of the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius (The Meditations) insinuate themselves unexpectedly into Marcus' life. In prison, he is saved by a chance meeting with Sextus Condianus, the "last Stoic" of the title, a cell-mate who is able to fully recite Aurelius' words and impart their wisdom. Ultimately, it is this unanticipated and unbidden instruction that gives the young man the strength he requires to survive. It becomes evident that the words of the venerable Stoic emperor have as much relevance to our own era as they did to his.

<merged with existing thread. Please, one thread per book. Bookmark this thread so that you can find it again, thanks! (If you have an old bookmark, change "kindleboards" to "kboards".) --Ann>
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·


The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon, August 13-15. 4+ stars. Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.

US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

"Morgan has written a book that is highly original and beautifully executed. The balance between the Roman world and the modern world is maintained with skill and adroitness, and the narrative is deftly woven through both of these time periods, never faltering or losing momentum.

The Last Stoic is a fascinating, parallel look at two societies who are not, as it turns out, as different or distinct as one might think."

- Helen Humphreys

** Long-listed for the 2012 ReLit Award for Fiction.**

The Last Stoic is a story of appetite and fear, both modern and ancient. Half of the story's narrative occurs in the time and place of the ancient Roman Empire; the other half occurs in the present-day United States. The parallels between the two eras are so strong that the narrative continues uninterrupted as the setting shifts from historic Rome to modern America, alternating from chapter to chapter.

Marcus, a young man from a northern provincial border town, journeys deep into the heart of the empire and witnesses first-hand the excesses that can lead to ruin, both personal and political. His story offers an ancient commentary on the preoccupations of our own turbulent times. Shortly after his arrival, the empire is thrown into a panic by an unprecedented barbarian attack on the capital. Suspicion and paranoia abound. A young Roman/American runaway named Patrick, disillusioned with his own life and the state of his country, becomes convinced that Marcus is a dangerous traitor. Culminating in a public accusation made by Patrick, Marcus is wrongfully imprisoned, exiled and tortured as an enemy of the state. In prison, he confronts the many contradictions he has found in his adopted home, and in himself.

Throughout the story, in both eras, the writings of the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius (The Meditations) insinuate themselves unexpectedly into Marcus' life. In prison, he is saved by a chance meeting with Sextus Condianus, the "last Stoic" of the title, a cell-mate who is able to fully recite Aurelius' words and impart their wisdom. Ultimately, it is this unanticipated and unbidden instruction that gives the young man the strength he requires to survive. It becomes evident that the words of the venerable Stoic emperor have as much relevance to our own era as they did to his.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·


The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon, October 6-10, 2013. 4+ stars. Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.

US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

"Morgan has written a book that is highly original and beautifully executed. The balance between the Roman world and the modern world is maintained with skill and adroitness, and the narrative is deftly woven through both of these time periods, never faltering or losing momentum.

The Last Stoic is a fascinating, parallel look at two societies who are not, as it turns out, as different or distinct as one might think."

- Helen Humphreys

** Long-listed for the 2012 ReLit Award for Fiction.**

The Last Stoic is a story of appetite and fear, both modern and ancient. Half of the story's narrative occurs in the time and place of the ancient Roman Empire; the other half occurs in the present-day United States. The parallels between the two eras are so strong that the narrative continues uninterrupted as the setting shifts from historic Rome to modern America, alternating from chapter to chapter.

Marcus, a young man from a northern provincial border town, journeys deep into the heart of the empire and witnesses first-hand the excesses that can lead to ruin, both personal and political. His story offers an ancient commentary on the preoccupations of our own turbulent times. Shortly after his arrival, the empire is thrown into a panic by an unprecedented barbarian attack on the capital. Suspicion and paranoia abound. A young Roman/American runaway named Patrick, disillusioned with his own life and the state of his country, becomes convinced that Marcus is a dangerous traitor. Culminating in a public accusation made by Patrick, Marcus is wrongfully imprisoned, exiled and tortured as an enemy of the state. In prison, he confronts the many contradictions he has found in his adopted home, and in himself.

Throughout the story, in both eras, the writings of the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius (The Meditations) insinuate themselves unexpectedly into Marcus' life. In prison, he is saved by a chance meeting with Sextus Condianus, the "last Stoic" of the title, a cell-mate who is able to fully recite Aurelius' words and impart their wisdom. Ultimately, it is this unanticipated and unbidden instruction that gives the young man the strength he requires to survive. It becomes evident that the words of the venerable Stoic emperor have as much relevance to our own era as they did to his.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon, March 13-14. Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.

US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

"Morgan has written a book that is highly original and beautifully executed. The balance between the Roman world and the modern world is maintained with skill and adroitness, and the narrative is deftly woven through both of these time periods, never faltering or losing momentum.

The Last Stoic is a fascinating, parallel look at two societies who are not, as it turns out, as different or distinct as one might think."

- Helen Humphreys

** Long-listed for the 2012 ReLit Award for Fiction.**

The Last Stoic is a story of appetite and fear, both modern and ancient. Half of the story's narrative occurs in the time and place of the ancient Roman Empire; the other half occurs in the present-day United States. The parallels between the two eras are so strong that the narrative continues uninterrupted as the setting shifts from historic Rome to modern America, alternating from chapter to chapter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon, January 14-15, 2015. Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.

US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

"Morgan has written a book that is highly original and beautifully executed. The balance between the Roman world and the modern world is maintained with skill and adroitness, and the narrative is deftly woven through both of these time periods, never faltering or losing momentum.

The Last Stoic is a fascinating, parallel look at two societies who are not, as it turns out, as different or distinct as one might think."

- Helen Humphreys

** Long-listed for the 2012 ReLit Award for Fiction.**
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
For the holidays - The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon! Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.



US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

And, as an additional festive season bonus, enter to win one of two paperback copies of Bottle and Glass in this holiday, Goodreads giveaway:

https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/166063-bottle-and-glass



"Bottle and Glass is a highly original adventure story, set during the war of 1812, and framed using real taverns that once existed within the city of Kingston, Ontario. A fascinating study of escape, and a powerful history of 19th century frontier life; Bottle and Glass is a stunning achievement."

Helen Humphreys -- award‐winning novelist and poet laureate of Kingston, Ontario, author of seven novels including 'Afterimage', ' Coventry', and 'The Evening Chorus', nominated for the 2015 Governor General's Award.

Bottle and Glass is a story of survival and escape told from the barstools of two dozen boisterous Kingston taverns at the close of the War of 1812.

The novel follows the fortunes of Jeremy Castor and his cousin, Merit Davey, two young men
snatched from the Cornish coast by the Royal Navy in the summer of 1813. A year later, they arrive in Kingston, in The Dominion of Canada, a town tense with the fear and deprivation of war. Paid, pent, and thirsty, their first riotous night ashore is spent at a tavern, the novel's namesake, Violin, Bottle, and Glass.

On this Saturday night it seems like the entire town is crammed into the two‐story clapboard
roadhouse. It is thick with spicy bodies, sour tobacco, sweet liquor, and traces of sea‐salt. Each reveler has their own private need. The bos'n's mate looks to drink something other than lime‐leavened rum and he thinks of home. The young seamstress hopes to meet a midshipman and she thinks of away.

The bored need a distraction. The bottled, a release.

Jeremy and Merit meet sixteen‐year‐old Amelia Barrett, newly and unhappily married to Colonel Noble Spafford, a Peninsular War veteran many decades her senior. When, later that evening, Jeremy stumbles upon a dead man linked to the Colonel, the lives of these three people seeking freedom become bound together forever.

For more information and reviews, please visit: http://www.morganwade.ca
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·


The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon today only!

Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.

UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

** Long-listed for the 2012 ReLit Award for Fiction.**

The Last Stoic is a story of appetite and fear, both modern and ancient. Half of the story's narrative occurs in the time and place of the ancient Roman Empire; the other half occurs in the present-day United States. The parallels between the two eras are so strong that the narrative continues uninterrupted as the setting shifts from historic Rome to modern America, alternating from chapter to chapter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·


Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.

The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon, Oct 25-26.

US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

"Morgan has written a book that is highly original and beautifully executed. The balance between the Roman world and the modern world is maintained with skill and adroitness, and the narrative is deftly woven through both of these time periods, never faltering or losing momentum.

The Last Stoic is a fascinating, parallel look at two societies who are not, as it turns out, as different or distinct as one might think."

- Helen Humphreys

** Long-listed for the 2012 ReLit Award for Fiction.**

The Last Stoic is a story of appetite and fear, both modern and ancient. Half of the story's narrative occurs in the time and place of the ancient Roman Empire; the other half occurs in the present-day United States. The parallels between the two eras are so strong that the narrative continues uninterrupted as the setting shifts from historic Rome to modern America, alternating from chapter to chapter.

Marcus, a young man from a northern provincial border town, journeys deep into the heart of the empire and witnesses first-hand the excesses that can lead to ruin, both personal and political. His story offers an ancient commentary on the preoccupations of our own turbulent times. Shortly after his arrival, the empire is thrown into a panic by an unprecedented barbarian attack on the capital. Suspicion and paranoia abound. A young Roman/American runaway named Patrick, disillusioned with his own life and the state of his country, becomes convinced that Marcus is a dangerous traitor. Culminating in a public accusation made by Patrick, Marcus is wrongfully imprisoned, exiled and tortured as an enemy of the state. In prison, he confronts the many contradictions he has found in his adopted home, and in himself.

Throughout the story, in both eras, the writings of the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius (The Meditations) insinuate themselves unexpectedly into Marcus' life. In prison, he is saved by a chance meeting with Sextus Condianus, the "last Stoic" of the title, a cell-mate who is able to fully recite Aurelius' words and impart their wisdom. Ultimately, it is this unanticipated and unbidden instruction that gives the young man the strength he requires to survive. It becomes evident that the words of the venerable Stoic emperor have as much relevance to our own era as they did to his.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·


The Last Stoic e-book is free for download from Amazon, May 2-3. Ancient Rome meets Modern America - Historical Fiction with a twist.

US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A9MKOI2
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9MKOI2
CA: http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00A9MKOI2

"Morgan has written a book that is highly original and beautifully executed. The balance between the Roman world and the modern world is maintained with skill and adroitness, and the narrative is deftly woven through both of these time periods, never faltering or losing momentum.

The Last Stoic is a fascinating, parallel look at two societies who are not, as it turns out, as different or distinct as one might think."

- Helen Humphreys

** Long-listed for the 2012 ReLit Award for Fiction.**

The Last Stoic is a story of appetite and fear, both modern and ancient. Half of the story's narrative occurs in the time and place of the ancient Roman Empire; the other half occurs in the present-day United States. The parallels between the two eras are so strong that the narrative continues uninterrupted as the setting shifts from historic Rome to modern America, alternating from chapter to chapter.

Marcus, a young man from a northern provincial border town, journeys deep into the heart of the empire and witnesses first-hand the excesses that can lead to ruin, both personal and political. His story offers an ancient commentary on the preoccupations of our own turbulent times. Shortly after his arrival, the empire is thrown into a panic by an unprecedented barbarian attack on the capital. Suspicion and paranoia abound. A young Roman/American runaway named Patrick, disillusioned with his own life and the state of his country, becomes convinced that Marcus is a dangerous traitor. Culminating in a public accusation made by Patrick, Marcus is wrongfully imprisoned, exiled and tortured as an enemy of the state. In prison, he confronts the many contradictions he has found in his adopted home, and in himself.

Throughout the story, in both eras, the writings of the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius (The Meditations) insinuate themselves unexpectedly into Marcus' life. In prison, he is saved by a chance meeting with Sextus Condianus, the "last Stoic" of the title, a cell-mate who is able to fully recite Aurelius' words and impart their wisdom. Ultimately, it is this unanticipated and unbidden instruction that gives the young man the strength he requires to survive. It becomes evident that the words of the venerable Stoic emperor have as much relevance to our own era as they did to his.
 
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