Kindle Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Around 7.00 pm GMT last night, I made my eighth cup of instant and pressed the 'publish' button on my second novel.
As someone with zero budget to spend, (and I mean zero) I had spent the previous weeks  editing, re-editing and proof-reading my own manuscript; creating a cover and annoying my wife.
The more I edited, the less I liked my work.
By the third edit, I hated it with a passion.
It became a portrait that was never finished.
I had convinced myself that I should have remained a Cop and let other, better educated, well read souls write about murder and mayhem.
Even my dog avoided me, my temper was so foul.
Oh for the funds to send off my totally useless ramblings to a slick agent, who would reassure me of my undeniable talent and fix all my weak narrative in the blink of an eye.
I dreamed of a bespectacled proof reader, there at my behest, correcting my commas and semi colons.
But no, I was alone. Deserted by my dog and overdosing on caffeine.
Then a miracle happened. I went to the pub.
When I returned, my wife was sitting on the floor of our lounge, scrolling through my text.
"This is good Rob," she said.
"Is it?"
She gave me her best, 'don't push your luck with the compliments' look and handed me the laptop.
It has been said many times that writing a novel is a lonely business. Where would we be without the people close to us, who massage our fragile egos just enough to allow us to press 'Publish?'

   
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,562 Posts
I think we can all relate. I know I can. It isn't easy when you're waiting for and fearing those first reviews. The ego is a fragile thing and as writers, we subject ourselves to serious criticism everyday. You have a great life story and I'm sure that will come through in your work. Best of luck with your books.  :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Well, I think it depends on why you are writing in the first place and what the expected outcome is. I do have the same feelings of loneliness which I suppose most writers do, especially when they are starting out. However, if you are writing to write rather than to make money [lol] then the solitude of the activity is part of the attraction in a way. You have to immerse yourself anyway, so when you eventually emerge I think you should do so with pride rather than apprehension. Take positive criticism - which is sometimes hard but usually useful - and have confidence in what you are doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
Interesting Post. So you have given birth to (published) a second book- congratulations! Now your frustration is really just beginning, because who will read it? Forget the Agent, that imaginary person is more frustrated than you are. The BIG question is, how will you get paid Readers?

I have published 24 books with KDP and 22 with Pubit. I also have my own website Philduke.weebly.com that markets ebooks direct. If you want, send me your first chapter in MsWord for a free review and edit. Your writing interests me, and I may want to list it for sale, in which case you retain all rights, and keep the entire sales price.

My published titles include 5 on Sherlock Holmes. Being in the UK you are well located to promo Sherlock Holmes. If you want, promo them, and you can keep the entire KDP sales commission.

This is not a scam, I am building up business, look up my titles on Amazon.com. Send me an email with or without your chapter attached- your work interests me.

My current best seller is "Sherlock Holmes and the Flying Machine." See cover image below.

Best regards,

Phillip Duke Ph.D. (Phillip Duke).
[email protected]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
I know exactly how you feel. I'm not an indie (I actually don't think I'd have the courage to do all that myself -- I'd much rather have someone else do it) but I get those same nerves every time I send out a query letter or get an email from a publisher that I have to drum up the courage to open. It's even worse if you're a writer who writes for the sake of writing and not for money, I think. At least if you only do it for the money, you can justify low sales with bad marketing or something, but if you're just in it for readers, low sales will have you questioning yourself and your writing ability. It's a harsh life!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
I don't have anyone to massage my ego. I'm not sure it would help. It might even be a good thing that I don't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Catana said:
I don't have anyone to massage my ego. I'm not sure it would help. It might even be a good thing that I don't.
You're right. Sometimes you just need to someone to tell you that a crap book is crap. If we all just had people saying everything we wrote was good, we'd never have the drive to improve!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
622 Posts
I feel your pain. For the last year I've struggled with my own writing (writing a novel that won't let you go while simultaneously learning how to write sucks) pretty much in isolation. No local writers groups. The people close to me intrigued with the idea of me becoming a published author, but totally uninterested in what I'm writing.

I'm glad you have a supportive wife. I'm sure it makes all the difference in the end. And congrats on publishing your second novel.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,112 Posts
Very well said, Rob. For me, it's not just the affirmation ("this is good"), you know? It's in the sign that someone has taken your work seriously, really engaged with it. That's where the loneliness dissolves and is replaced by a sense of having made contact with someone through what you've written -- even if that other person sees flaws in it. The first time I got that kind of feedback -- in a review by KBer Harry Dewulf, actually -- I was so unexpected moved. It took a while for me to understand why. It was the sense that this part of me I'd put out into the world all alone had truly been seen. Does that make any sense? I know the idea of the "artist" putting a piece of herself into her work is cliche (sorry for the scare quotes ... I have trouble putting myself in that category). But darned if that isn't what it feels like sometimes: that I've cut a little bit of myself off, and if no one really engages with it, it'll just be alone out there forever. Fortunately that hasn't happened. I haven't sold a ton of copies, but I know there are people out there who've really engaged. It's enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Feud_writer said:
Well, I think it depends on why you are writing in the first place and what the expected outcome is. I do have the same feelings of loneliness which I suppose most writers do, especially when they are starting out. However, if you are writing to write rather than to make money [lol] then the solitude of the activity is part of the attraction in a way. You have to immerse yourself anyway, so when you eventually emerge I think you should do so with pride rather than apprehension. Take positive criticism - which is sometimes hard but usually useful - and have confidence in what you are doing.
What Feud said! Especially about 'writing to write rather than to make money' (not 'lol' but 'ttt' - that's the truth). When people find out I write some, and right after they ask me to take a look at their poetry or their memoir, they often ask what advice I have about becoming a writer. Most of us know the answer... All together now: keep you day job!

I do love the immersion of it all and I'm happy enough with the solitude though it wears after a while. I do envy you if you have confidence in what you are doing. I don't but I want people to like what I've done as I doubt anyone will. (And, my book's a good read if not for the faint of heart).

An aside: becareful what you wish for phildukephd - you just might have it granted. I predict a very full inbox is in your future ;). (Hmmm, will my next one be there.) Good luck with your business.

Another aside: boy, Morgan, do I know what you mean - everyone wants to come to the party, no one wants to stay to clean up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,262 Posts
The wife has told me several times that my stuff is good, but I don't trust her opinion. She loves me too much NOT to try to spare my feelings. Not tryi9ng to bring you down, just sayin'. Yeah, it's freakin' lonely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I don't know what responses I expected, a mixed bag I suppose.
It begs the questions: Can someone close really be objective enough to say, 'yeah that's good?"  or are they too involved, just as we are too close to the subject matter to write blurb or decide which chapter needs a good edit?
I think the point I wanted to make is this:
During the excitement of the first draft, we can immerse ourselves in the plot and characters without feeling the need to ask for advice or noticing the solitude that we endure to complete it.
Once the adrenalin has subsided and the nuts and bolts of being a writer start to grip, that is when self doubt rears it's ugly head. When we start to analyse each sentence or character trait and the process is no longer exciting, confidence in the product of our labour can easily wane.
Do I think my wife is biased? Of course I do. Did it make me feel better? Of course it did. Did it feel different when I got my first unsolicited reviews on Amazon? Without a doubt! Good reviews sell books.
As for my wife, I think I'll keep listening to her.

Robert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Just because she may be bias does not mean she is wrong. I left a good book on the shelf for ten years until my son bullied me into publishing it. He had a confidence in me that I didn't have and I'm glad he did.

You will not get those amazon reviews if you don't publish -even the good ones. Look around amazon at best seller reviews. Bad reveiws don't stop sales.

Writing can be an endurance contest with yourself. I'm told that if that beats you, you are not a writer. So, soldier on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,596 Posts
'Everybody's goin' out and havin' fun; Umma just sittin' here and havin' none...'  Hell yeah, it is lonely.  I'm lucky I don't have a lot of friends calling me up.  Oh, and I'm single.  That may change in the near future.  But umma gonna insist on my own writin' room. 
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top