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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The People's Treasure

The Jade Owl Legacy - Book IV

Reading with the Author Klub - Introduction

by Edward C. Patterson
Kindleboard Profile for The People's Treasure
Welcome, Jade Owl travelers to the Fourth Book in the Series - a mad dash to gather up the broken pieces of the first three books and deliver a complete relic for the Fifth Book: In the Shadow of Her Hem.

Like the first three books, the journey is a long one, but I know all China Hands will be on board and ready for active readership duty. Unlike the previous Read with the Author klub, I am taking this one a little slower, perhaps because the action is almost non-stop for 600 pages and the subtleties stud each chapter. Like the entire Jade Owl series in this Klub, if you haven;t read the other books, you can start back at the beginning and find the notes, questions, discussions still available, and as always, I am available across the entire series. So don't hesitate to start at the beginning. For those here for Book Four, I will be entering the first post here later today or tomorrow, so track it using the notify button and you'll know when the first bit comes up. However, you should start the first chapters - take a step back into the world of la Giada Guffo, because unlike the first three books, this one begins in ITALY.

Happy reading
Edward C. Patterson (hereafter known as Ed P)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
When we last left the China Hands, they were in mourning for Nick Battle and  the world exploded at Tadzio and Clarissa's wedding in Fiesole. If you recall, Rowden introduced his young son to his cousin via phantom's in the high grasses at Campo Culadura and Simone and Silky felt Nick's presence in the muninescen of the flowers. This was brought about by Rowden's fulfillment of Nick's last request — to light a bonfire that could be see in far off Sienna. So, it should come as no surprise that we begin the fourth book in Fiesole, a year later at the dead of night.

In the first two chapters, I begin a carousel of introducing the pick-up for the story  — a vortex to a storm which will change locations and characters as quick as instant noodles. However, unlike the other novels, the first elements introduced are not characters, by symbols.

1 - Why would I choose night time and black colored birds to introduce the work? And why Swallows? And why would fireflies pose a threat to birds?

2 - Nick disppears at the end of the last book, as out of sight as the Jade Owl was in the that book. How do we continue to track a portion of Nick's presence? And why?

3 - Why would I chose the old battleaxe of the aunt to convey instructions and prophesy?

4 - Why would the shield be hidden in Stefani's room?

5 - Where is the "place" that Berenice tells in the prophery?

6 - What scene from The Dragon's Pool is recalled in the Culadura.

7 - Why would the life in the fields collapse when Tadzio extricates the relic?

8 - What has held the Jade Owl its grasp in the Culadura (guess - I'm not specific in this)

9 - Who is Master Marsh (just a refresher question)?

Chapter Three switches settings and tone as we seek the second of the Three Women. I'll post some items for that later in th week.

Enjoy . . .

Ed P
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, we could. I will say the quote from the Tao teh-ching is there because it squarely fits the material. The rest are snippets from the book itself, but the last one is of interest, because I translate when it appears in the work (toward the end), I do not translate it, so this is the only tiem I give a translation.

Discussion?

Ed P
 

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It was clear that several were from, if not this book, a previous volume.  But I was interested in the one from the Tao. . .maybe we should come back to discussing them after we've read the book so we can see if we can figure out why you picked them. :)

 

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1 - Why would I choose night time and black colored birds to introduce the work? And why Swallows? And why would fireflies pose a threat to birds?
Well, things are more mysterious then. . .and you can see fireflies and glowing jade owls better in the dark.
I guess too many fireflies could cause problems. . .and this bunch seems to be very well coordinated. :)
2 - Nick disppears at the end of the last book, as out of sight as the Jade Owl was in the that book. How do we continue to track a portion of Nick's presence? And why?
Well, Nick, was the Owl in a way. . .and of course Tadzio still 'channels' him from time to time. . .and does in these chapters. . .
3 - Why would I chose the old battleaxe of the aunt to convey instructions and prophesy?
Much more dramatic to have a woman who's been essentially paralyzed -- in the sense of having no will to move or do anything -- for the last year or so. . .and she was one of those who disturbed the owl's resting place
4 - Why would the shield be hidden in Stefani's room?
I gather 'whatsername' (sorry, I'm blanking but I'll know it in a minute -- Rawdon's first wife -- is it Rose--- something?) was given that room when she first came to the villa. And she's the one who buried the Owl, so it makes sense she'd have hidden the other things in that room. BTW, how much later does this take place. . .I seem to have missed that.
5 - Where is the "place" that Berenice tells in the prophery?
I'm guessing back to China, maybe the cave where the dragon's pool is. . .or someplace else that I am only half remembering. ::)
6 - What scene from The Dragon's Pool is recalled in the Culadura.
I remember some light got sucked in from somewhere, but I'm not recalling specifics. ::)
7 - Why would the life in the fields collapse when Tadzio extricates the relic?
It was pretty clearly implied in previous volumes that nothing grew there until the relic was removed. . .and it does apparently, really, have some sort of radiation. . . .It is interesting that it happened so quickly, however.
8 - What has held the Jade Owl its grasp in the Culadura (guess - I'm not specific in this)
I figured it was just unwilling to be unearthed by someone not worthy. . . .which is why it killed Gillenhall and affected the battleaxe . . .who apparently was o.k. after it was removed from the ground. . .hmm. . . .
9 - Who is Master Marsh (just a refresher question)?
Silky. . . .sort of protege of Nick and Simone. . .also a favorite of the old grandmother. . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pretty much tracking right away. The fireflies ar a parallel to the swarm of bees that showed up in the waterwheel scene in the Dragon's Pool. Berenice is an empty shell (see whats-a-coming) and a perfect vessel for the Jade Owl's voice. Silky was a favorite of Sung Yi-ti. The reason for the struggle to keep the Jade Owl securely at Culadura is because it is an Etruscan burial ground and the spirit of the dead have guarding it. (key point as we go forward with the relic on the move). I had the field collapse quickly for drmatic effect. The pararall scene in the field is when Berenice and Gillenhaal try to dig up the Owl and Papa Silvestri carries them back in his wheelbarrow. In this case I have him pushing Tadzio and Clari.

Great. We can discuss the Tao teh ching and we go along.

Gung-xi Fa-cai Year of the Rabbit.

Onward to Shang-hai.

Ed P
 

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Request:  I'm reading ahead -- how could I not? ::)  Could we have a brief 'where we left off' note here?  It's kind of coming back as I read. . .I finished chapter 10 of Part 1 last night. . . but some clarity would be helpful.  Just a hint of a reminder as to where everyone was at the end of the last book.  Are we a year later now?  Or two? . . . I'm fuzzy on that. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Howdy. Wow you read faster than I write. ;D

Yeas, it's not about a year later (a little longer as arttested by the childrens' ages and size). When we left off, we were at Tadzio's wedding. Rowden, Audrey, little John (a wee one then), Amy, Rose, Silky, Rafaelo, Simone and Tadzio (duh) were in attendance in Fiesole. When we ended, there was a hint that part of Nick's ch'i was trapped and evoked in the Jade Owl as buried at Culadura, and the rest of him with the other 2 critters was plastered in a ch'i banner at the Dragon's Pool.

As ypu have read the first 10 Chapters, you can see that this book starts with the cast dispersed and. evidently, being summoned. I fact, it's like a giant vortex, sucking them back to a point where they are together.

Chapter Three - Four - Five - the Shag-hai reunion

1 - Why is Moorehouse reluctant to get involved with The Jade Owl affair again?

2 - Bradley is one of my more painful character arcs, because when we meet him in The Jade Owl he's a good joe - a meddler, but we can understand it. Of course, his love for Nick is not an uncommon human fraity, but it does sour the apple in the next two books. Why would I ever introduce him again here if his character has already arc'd?

3 - Father and daughter relationships in Chinese culture are very brittle. Children have specific roles in taditional Chinese culture, or so we're told - however, Mrs. K'ao (Ch'en Fu-lan) has a truly line on that role and this relationship. Even back in the day when women were disregarded, the culture still accorded them the powerful familial bond that made a Chinese family gel. There are countless historical points where the Chinese world was controled by women, with the menfolk acting as puppets. Now Minister Ch'en is not a puppet (far from it). But he is kept in check by no one but his daughter.

4 - Now a question: What is the significance of this coin to those who have not read The Nan Tu? Venture a guess.

5 - The second woman seems unlikely, since we haven;t seen Joy since the first book. However, why would she come to Lung-hua Temple? Why not directly to Bradley?

6 - Who is the (or what are) the Keepers of the Tears of Guan-yin?

7 - Why would the Ambassador to China be resident in Shang-hai and now Bei-jing? (And don;t say to make Ed's story flow better).

Chapter Six and Seven abd Eight: North and West China

1 - Why has Sydney returned to Bei-jing and with his son and wife?

2 - Notice any changes in Sydney Firestone? (And if you've read the Nan Tu, how do they reflect on the physical arc for this character).

3 - Nicky Firestone is the joy of this author's life (and of his editor's). Introduced here for the second time (the first time he was smaller and being dumped on his head by Nick Battle at a party), Nicky has his father's wit. Tall for his age, Nicky really doesn;t fit in with his coursins, but he picks up the language fast. Why is he confined in the hu-tung?

4 - Thomas Ch'en has always been serious, but in this work he comes into his own. Why are the hu-tung's being torn down - I'm not specific in this (other than one story line connection), but there could be events occuring.

5 - There's nothing like a little villainy and a recurring villain - enter Officer Yu K'ang. Why is Yu K'ang not detained like his boss (former boss) Gou P'i? Do we all remember what Gou P'i means in Mandarin?

6 - The China Hands all show a reluctance to using their powers, but Sydney is getting to be a loose canon. Why?

7 - The People's Treasure delves more deeply (as will the final book) into modern Chinese human rights issues (I'm surprised I have readers in Bei-jing - and I do). How does the story of William Ch'en effect the previous information from the other books regarding the Ch'en family.

8 - Little Cricket and Charlie and Magistate Lu Xing again. Why would I bring us back up Mt. Li for this scene?

9 - Any surprise as to who subverts Magistrate's plans on the mountain?

BTW, the Mt. Li scene was originally the opening of this book, but revision and a better sense of my art changed that.

Chapter Nine and Ten

1 - Why could I take the risk of waiting 73 pages before re-introducing the protagonist in this book?

2 - How would you characterize Rowden's relationship to his children? To Audrey?

3 - We have seen Xiao Win-t'o mellowing in the othre books, but he's taken that last step in this one. Why do we need him? What role do you think he'll play?

4 - Yosemite is symbolic of what for the series?

5 - What deja-vu occurs at the jewllery concession?

6 - Yes, dear readers, Griffen Jones is back, and as a major character. Wewoka is still spooky. Of course, she's the third woman in the section title. Why three women? Why not two or ten?

7 - What's in New York?

8 - Throughout the first part all the characters hear whispers or have premonitions. How is this connectyive thought being transmitted?

. . . and the last two Chapters of this sector, bring us full circle to San Francisco and the tap the last set needed, before the story begins.

Enjoy

Ed P
 

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Chapter Three - Four - Five - the Shag-hai reunion

1 - Why is Moorehouse reluctant to get involved with The Jade Owl affair again?
Well, it wasn't much fun for him the first time, was it? And now he's the ambassador so has certain responsibilities. Besides. . .it brings up all of his memories of Nick again.
2 - Bradley is one of my more painful character arcs, because when we meet him in The Jade Owl he's a good joe - a meddler, but we can understand it. Of course, his love for Nick is not an uncommon human fraity, but it does sour the apple in the next two books. Why would I ever introduce him again here if his character has already arc'd?
Maybe it hasn't. ;) And perhaps he's due for a little closure. . . .
3 - Father and daughter relationships in Chinese culture are very brittle. Children have specific roles in taditional Chinese culture, or so we're told - however, Mrs. K'ao (Ch'en Fu-lan) has a truly line on that role and this relationship. Even back in the day when women were disregarded, the culture still accorded them the powerful familial bond that made a Chinese family gel. There are countless historical points where the Chinese world was controled by women, with the menfolk acting as puppets. Now Minister Ch'en is not a puppet (far from it). But he is kept in check by no one but his daughter.
She certainly has a lot of influence with him. . .she's much more even tempered, as well, where as he goes hot and cold. Which is not surprising really: he's been a minister, a man of power. She was a tour guide. . .gotta stay 'medium' with a bunch of crazy foreigners. :)
4 - Now a question: What is the significance of this coin to those who have not read The Nan Tu? Venture a guess.
Well, it belongs to Li Kai Men (spelling?) which means it's closely alligned to the Owl, etc. Possibly another way to get back to the past or unlock some other relic's powers.
5 - The second woman seems unlikely, since we haven;t seen Joy since the first book. However, why would she come to Lung-hua Temple? Why not directly to Bradley?
Well, she's in thrall to something, isn't she? And as they explain at the temple, it was where the 'keeper' first came. She's sort of a new keeper. Honestly, I only vaguely remember her from earlier. . . .
6 - Who is the (or what are) the Keepers of the Tears of Guan-yin?
Li Kai Men sent his servant(?) with the Tears to protect them. . . . that duty was passed down through the ages. . . .
7 - Why would the Ambassador to China be resident in Shang-hai and now Bei-jing? (And don;t say to make Ed's story flow better).
Well, Beijing is the capital. . . .so as the Ambassador that's where one would think he would be. But China is big so I wouldn't be surprised to know there's an American Consulate or something in Shanghai which is a port. And he'd probably need to spend some time in each place. Plus, one or the other might be better given weather conditions. . . .like in India where the Brits all moved to the mountains for the summers. . . .
 

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Chapter Six and Seven abd Eight: North and West China

1 - Why has Sydney returned to Bei-jing and with his son and wife?
Theoretically to help the Chen family in its quest to keep their property. But, honestly, I'm not sure what he can do. And I don't see why they can't leave the house except that the government is just mad at them.
2 - Notice any changes in Sydney Firestone? (And if you've read the Nan Tu, how do they reflect on the physical arc for this character).
It was implied that he's 'conserving' himself. . . .getting younger and stronger. . . . .I guess I need to go read those other books, huh? :)
3 - Nicky Firestone is the joy of this author's life (and of his editor's). Introduced here for the second time (the first time he was smaller and being dumped on his head by Nick Battle at a party), Nicky has his father's wit. Tall for his age, Nicky really doesn;t fit in with his coursins, but he picks up the language fast. Why is he confined in the hu-tung?
I gather the government refuses to recognize his status. . . . .not sure why except that they just don't like the Chen family.
4 - Thomas Ch'en has always been serious, but in this work he comes into his own. Why are the hu-tung's being torn down - I'm not specific in this (other than one story line connection), but there could be events occuring.
My guess is that they're looking to build more housing. . .and wasn't a bunch of housing razed for the construction of the various venues for the Olympics. . . .o'course this story is sort of 'out of time' in that sense. . .but it's not hard to envision the government deciding that modern apartments will be more efficient than a bunch of old houses, even if they are pretty big.
5 - There's nothing like a little villainy and a recurring villain - enter Officer Yu K'ang. Why is Yu K'ang not detained like his boss (former boss) Gou P'i? Do we all remember what Gou P'i means in Mandarin?
Fat pig, or some such. I guess Yu Kang was just far enough from the poop that hit the fan that none got on him. ::) He's not a nice person either. . .
6 - The China Hands all show a reluctance to using their powers, but Sydney is getting to be a loose canon. Why?
Well, if he is 'conserving' himself -- youthening -- then he's getting back to the teen age years where good sense is much rarer to be had. . . .
7 - The People's Treasure delves more deeply (as will the final book) into modern Chinese human rights issues (I'm surprised I have readers in Bei-jing - and I do). How does the story of William Ch'en effect the previous information from the other books regarding the Ch'en family.
It explains both why they are willing to befriend the American group. . .and why they are extremely careful about what the let be known. And why they're good at finding a way to do things out of sight of the government -- passes to off limits areas, etc.
8 - Little Cricket and Charlie and Magistate Lu Xing again. Why would I bring us back up Mt. Li for this scene?
The Magistrate wanted to see for himself that the gang's story was true. . . .about the cave and all. . .Cricket and Charlie are natural guides, having been there.
9 - Any surprise as to who subverts Magistrate's plans on the mountain?
Yes! As I recall he's not evil really, just obsessed with getting his name on a dragon species, right?
 

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Chapter Nine and Ten

1 - Why could I take the risk of waiting 73 pages before re-introducing the protagonist in this book?
Well, but, really, there isn't just ONE protagonist. . .there's a whole ensemble cast. BTW, I do hope we'll see Simone again.
2 - How would you characterize Rowden's relationship to his children? To Audrey?
He seems a good dad. . .and an affectionate husband. . . fairly normal, really, given what he's seen.
3 - We have seen Xiao Win-t'o mellowing in the othre books, but he's taken that last step in this one. Why do we need him? What role do you think he'll play?
I'm guessing he's probably got the most 'corporate' knowledge of the chinese side of the family. . having been closest to the old grandmother over the years. He may end up being Rowdy's sounding board. . .
4 - Yosemite is symbolic of what for the series?
I recall that Nick and Rowdy went there early in the first book and met up with Griffen and his grandmother.
5 - What deja-vu occurs at the jewllery concession?
Someone else ended up in a bit of a trance there in the first book, didn't they? But I don't recall specifics.
6 - Yes, dear readers, Griffen Jones is back, and as a major character. Wewoka is still spooky. Of course, she's the third woman in the section title. Why three women? Why not two or ten?
Numerologically speaking 3 is an important number. . .in lots of cultures. . .I think we had this discussion in the last book too. . .I should go find what I wrote then. :)
7 - What's in New York?
Rose, of course. . .and the seven sisters banners. . . aka portals to the past. :)
8 - Throughout the first part all the characters hear whispers or have premonitions. How is this connectyive thought being transmitted?
Well, Nick's spirit is in the owl. . .and he has a close connection for various reasons with many of the characters. Those with powers got the powers from the owl. . .others loved him so hold a part of him within them.
. . . and the last two Chapters of this sector, bring us full circle to San Francisco and the tap the last set needed, before the story begins.
Well, then. I'm off to start chapter 11. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sydney has returned because Mei Lin wanted to stand with the family and wanted Nicky to come to China at least once. Little did they know that the marraige wasn;t recognized and they would be caught in a Chinese quandary, which basically places Syndney and his son under house arrest.

Gou P'i means
Pig Farts
, pretty close remembering it had something to do with pigs, but in Mandarin colloquoal it translates to BS.

When the Olympic construction was started, many of the hu-tung's were bulldozed. However, because of the timing issues I only inferred that "progress" was being made. The hu-tungs were still under fire until recently, when a major construction project for museum was halted, the government finally reversing its trend to destroy these old Bei-jing neighbor hoods - some dating back to the Ming. (The Yuan-Mongol city walls were destroyed to make way for T-ien An-men Square - something Rowden benoaned in the first book).

Yes, 3 is important in Chinese (triads etc). However in this case I was being Wagnerian. The three women evoke the Norns who prophesy at the beginning of Wagner's Götterdämmerung. It's an ED thing. ;D

The Human Rights issues will come better to light - but the Ch'en family's personal tragedy is alluded to in the First Book (in passing) by Minister Ch'en in Tien An-men, and in the second book my Thomas when he chides Rose in the hu-tung. However, now it all comes out - the reason for the political poop that the family may be in and the reason for Gamma Ch'en apparent insanity.

Magistrate Lu Xin was given the tomb key by Rowden calling it the People's Treasure (althoguh I'm never too clear on what or who is the People's Treasure, since Treasure can be plural). He is there to assure that the door opens. As for Canto - yes, he's after his dino-babies (babies no longer), but there's a lot more to that story, and I'll not spoil.

Rowden is still the overall core protagonist, especially as we approach the last book. However, in a series, author's can violate the rules and present the foremost character a little later on. In this case, I did it on purpose so the reader might anticipate (hopefully with excitement) Rowdy's first appearance. As for many protagonists - well, as a challenge for me, I have scene where I need to deal with as many as 19 of them at a time - no easy feat. You'll tell me whether I succeed or not.

Yep, Rowden's a good Dad and loves familiy life. If he didn't, he'd have no sacrifice to make as the story blooms. he relationship between Audrey and Rowden is complex, has been and will continue to be so.

Xiao Win-t'o loves Rowden's children - but remember, although mellowed, he's still Chinatown's Don, which makes him a bit of a Godfather character still. To be the big cheese of the neighbor might come in handy for a story teller. ;D

Yosemite represents supreme serenity - a place where nature can recall the past, which it does. The deja vu is the paralell with the Open and Closed signs on the door, and Wewoka going into a trance again.

Now to backtrack on Sydney's condition. One of the side effects of being The Preserver is an aging reversal process. The character in Souther Swallow series that is The Preserver is the old Viceroy K'ang Yu-wei. He's old in the forst book The Academician and older in The Nan Tu, until he drinks the Tears of Guang-yin and becomes a member of the ch'i-t'ang. Here's an excerpt from The Nan Tu, when "old" K'ang Yu-wei the preserve comes on board the Imperial ship The Raven and General Chang Chun notes the change in K'ang's appearance:

"K'ang Yu-wei turned toward the array of navvies who lined the way to the poop deck. Suddenly, Chang Chun appeared, hail and hearty, coming to the old gentleman with outstretched hands as if he were welcoming him to a wedding.
"Master K'ang," he crowed. "You're back among us, praise be to Guan-yin. And . . ." Chang Chun surveyed him. "Astonishing. You're as lithe as a young man of forty, sir. Your hair is white, but your face is . . . smooth. Your back, straight."
K'ang Yu-wei regarded Nan Ya.
"It's all his doing," he said.
"Well, that explains it," Chang Chun chuckled.
Li K'ai-men didn't appreciate such credit and feared that it opened up the wound that bled between him and Chang Chun. But suddenly, K'ang Yu-wei turned toward the sea - sighing, his lips trembled as if he tasted the salty air.
"This is not the gift you might think it is," he said, his voice trailing. "I looked forward to old age, the bones creaking; the breath shortened. I longed to retire to my cottage at Lake Tung-ma, with my children and their children taking their turns with me. Now the world's reversed and I grow younger every day. Some day I'll need to recall my studies and seek an infant's suck toy. This is not the way it should be. If the sun never sets, the soul burns until the brilliance and luster spends it into haze. For me, the days shall go on unending and uncounted until the world is an unhappiness that no man can bear. There once was a time when I was young and happy, and a time when I longed for death's sweet peace, every man's right under Heaven. Now, General Chang, happiness has been replaced by habit and I can see no end."
K'ang Yu-wei sighed again, and then glanced back to Nan Ya, who knew.
"And that, sir," K'ang said. "That explains it."

As for Simone . . . you've probably run into her/him by now.

And as for the coin, here's another excerpt from The Nan Tu. K'u Ko-ling (who we've met in The Third Peregrination and who is the narator for the entire Southern Swallow series, at this point has been sent south, where he has fallen for a local prostitute in the ruined city of Su-chou. A glimmer summons him back and instructs him to take the woman to Lung-hua (she carries K'u ko-ling's bastard). She becomes the first Keeper of the Tears of Guan-yin and the coin. That bastard is the ancestor to Meng Ka-bao).

"The coin spun in the moonlight making it appear more golden than copper. It was a large coin - one minted by Emperor Hui, the only Son of Heaven to have presumed to make coins so big. K'u Ko-ling had cherished this coin from his youngest days in Su-chou, when his master had given him a slew of oversized cash to buy himself a moon cake. Now, he liked to practice his levitation skills with this coin and often did it at night, when sleep wouldn't come.
K'u Ko-ling smiled at the copper as it winked at him. What purpose did it serve that he could do this thing, except that his master had told him to practice? As he thought of his master, the coin brightened and then . . . flash. He thought he saw a fiery disk as round and bright as the moon. He shook his head, but didn't want to wake his companion, who snored lightly on her cushions. Still, K'u Ko-ling trembled.
Slowly, he sat up on the k'ang bed, bringing the coin softly to rest in his hand. He stared at it, and then gasped. He heard the whispers on the fricative and wanted to shut his mind to them. He arose, going to the threshold, the moon's fullness catching him. The voice was sweet at first, but then visions crowded his mind, claiming his will. He raised his palm to the moon, the coin trembling to leave his control.
"Sweetness," came a voice from the bed. "Do you play with that coin again?"
The coin levitated, this time floating toward his eye. He gazed at the woman in his bed through the coin hole. She was lovely, even in the midnight shadows.

etc. etc. etc.

Ed P
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The last two chapters in the first part are devoted to the San Francisco crowd, and reintroduce Silky, Ch'u Kan -ma (Warren), his father Ch'u Bai-dui (the apothocary), Meng Ka-bao and the divine Simon DeFluerry. The People's Treasure is a network of character, each having an important role (even new ones yet to be introduced). In that, of the novels in the series, it is a kaleidoscope of relationships and interlocking actions.

1 - Does the opening of Chapter Eleven recall any other scene in the Series between two other gay characters.

2 - Why does Silky still have his Dragon Rider's outfit and sword? What could this potend fo future developments? (Who was it that commented that they didn't understand why the China Hands came through the portal naked - and in front of school children, no less)?  ;D ;D

3 - How does Silky lock out Meng Ka-bao from reading Tadzio's letter?

4 - How has Mother DeFluerry changed? (The image of Simone in the little perch for this scene has been in my head for many years. It was a special moment to write this chapter).

5 - Besides the contents of the letter, what is the most unusual fact in the letter reading scene?

Onward to part two - New Yawk City. I'll post a link here to the new thread when it's up.

Ed P
 

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Edward C. Patterson said:
The last two chapters in the first part are devoted to the San Francisco crowd, and reintroduce Silky, Ch'u Kan -ma (Warren), his father Ch'u Bai-dui (the apothocary), Meng Ka-bao and the divine Simon DeFluerry. The People's Treasure is a network of character, each having an important role (even new ones yet to be introduced). In that, of the novels in the series, it is a kaleidoscope of relationships and interlocking actions.

1 - Does the opening of Chapter Eleven recall any other scene in the Series between two other gay characters.
Charlie and Cricket
2 - Why does Silky still have his Dragon Rider's outfit and sword? What could this potend fo future developments? (Who was it that commented that they didn't understand why the China Hands came through the portal naked - and in front of school children, no less)? ;D ;D
Yeah, that was me. . . .but apparently dragon riders are exempt. . .still not sure of the details as to why, though? I expect the rider costume will become important for something later. . .maybe to go back through a portal?
3 - How does Silky lock out Meng Ka-bao from reading Tadzio's letter?
Battle's eyeglass frames shield the mind. . .Nick used to use 'em. . . .
4 - How has Mother DeFluerry changed? (The image of Simone in the little perch for this scene has been in my head for many years. It was a special moment to write this chapter).
she's grieving. . . .
5 - Besides the contents of the letter, what is the most unusual fact in the letter reading scene?
. . . the fact that the he was able to bring the glasses through the portal. . . .
Onward to part two - New Yawk City. I'll post a link here to the new thread when it's up.

Ed P
I'm way ahead of you. . . .on Chapter 2. . .of part 2 I think. . . .hard to tell as there's no TOC to jump to. . . 29%, location 4211, page 201. :)
 

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Right on, Ann. Except one - The key point of the letter reading is that Silky can understand Itlian, but doesn;t know Italian.  ;D

I'm glad you're ahead - so tomorrow I'll try to catch up. This weekend I'm in NJ and will be without my computer (unless I hop on my brother's), but I be in New York and ahead of you again.  ;D

On the TOC, I always include one, but I have never implemented hyperlinks for them. I guess that's me as a reader. I believe in hyperlinks when the books had multimple works (anthologies etc), but I usually read straight through with Kindle files with only one work. But I DO include my covers.  ;D

Ed P
 

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Edward C. Patterson said:
Right on, Ann. Except one - The key point of the letter reading is that Silky can understand Itlian, but doesn;t know Italian. ;D
Oh. . . I'd understood he'd explained that in that Tadzio taught him while they were in the past. . . which I interpreted as they experienced something together and so he just knew the language because he knows Tadzio.

Is it a problem that things like that don't seem odd? ??? ;D

I'm glad you're ahead - so tomorrow I'll try to catch up. This weekend I'm in NJ and will be without my computer (unless I hop on my brother's), but I be in New York and ahead of you again. ;D

On the TOC, I always include one, but I have never implemented hyperlinks for them. I guess that's me as a reader. I believe in hyperlinks when the books had multimple works (anthologies etc), but I usually read straight through with Kindle files with only one work. But I DO include my covers. ;D

Ed P
I was only trying to figure out which part I was in and if I could have gone at least to where the ToC started it would have been easier. . . .though it's near the cover so not really a big deal. :)

The thing that's nice about linked ToC on Kindle is that then you get the dots along the progress bar so you have an idea of how long a chapter is. . . . ..
 
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