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I read this tonight, got it free here:http://feedbooks.com/book/3609

Interesting info here (be careful of spoilers in story description): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Yellow_Wallpaper

Would love to hear others thoughts on this interesting story!

It is a very quick read and I thought it
an incredibly well crafted story. You are slowly pulled into her madness and with just tiny changes in syntax your realize she had gone from observing to being one of the women she imagines. There are also other subtleties as she describes her life and her lack of control over it.
Haunting and skillfully done, I think I may read it again in a few days...

Love the feedbooks site by the way. This was my first freebie and I just saw Gone With the Wind on there, which I have always wanted to read, even more so since moving to Atlanta.
 

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I remember this!

Oh man, I read it in a Lit class years ago and have thought on and off about it ever since. I'm sure I forgot the name until now, and the story itself kinda faded from my memory after a while, but this post has brought it all back for me.

Wasn't the word "wallflower" influenced by this story? I could be wrong on that, or it could've been the professor's own speculation.

In any case, thank you for this post. I'll be downloading this tonight for sure.
 

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CS said:
I remember this!

Oh man, I read it in a Lit class years ago and have thought on and off about it ever since. I'm sure I forgot the name until now, and the story itself kinda faded from my memory after a while, but this post has brought it all back for me.

Wasn't the word "wallflower" influenced by this story? I could be wrong on that, or it could've been the professor's own speculation.

In any case, thank you for this post. I'll be downloading this tonight for sure.
Pretty much my story, too. It made a huge impression as I've never forgotten this title. "Haunting", yes. It lead to a very lively discussion in class - gender roles, expectations, social expectations, etc.

*Thank You* for posting this, Octochick! Now I have it too. I will read it again & post my feedback when I can.

Marci
 

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This discussion put me in mind of the short stories I used to use with college freshmen. Short stories are an acquired taste, but they worked nicely in a one semester class where novels would have made students founder. The Yellow Wallpaper always went over well. Several more that usually prompted good discussions were

A Rose for Emily (Faulkner)
The Chrysanthemums (Steinbeck)
The Lottery (Shirley Jackson)
The Story of an Hour (Kate Chopin)
The Storm (Kate Chopin)
Greasy Lake (T. C. Boyle)
Hills Like White Elephants (Hemingway)
A Clean, Well Lighted Place (Hemingway)

My personal favorites are the two by Kate Chopin. She lived in New Orleans and wrote around the turn of the last century, and her treatment of her subject matter (women in society) was so controversial that the (male) establishment shut her down. She wasn't rediscovered until the women's movement in the 1970s. Even today, her stories shock some people. Both of the ones above are just terrific. The Story of an Hour is a masterpiece in miniature, and The Storm is hilarious and surprising.

That website wouldn't come up, or I would have checked to see if these were available too. If they are, or are available elsewhere, KindleBoarders might enjoy them too!

///////Al
aka BrassMan

 

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I have never read The Yellow Wallpaper and now I am curious so I will download it. Thanks for the tip, Octochick!

L
 

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Brassman -

"The Lottery" is a classic - and readers, don't let the word "classic" fool you. Nothing old or musty about it!  Just great storytelling.

I'll now have to look into those Kate Chopin short stories.  I have read her but now I can't remember what title I read ::)

Marci
 

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Marci said:
Brassman -

"The Lottery" is a classic - and readers, don't let the word "classic" fool you. Nothing old or musty about it! Just great storytelling.

I'll now have to look into those Kate Chopin short stories. I have read her but now I can't remember what title I read ::)

Marci
Good point, Marci. Sometimes the word "classic" means fusty, or hard to read and obscure. "A Rose for Emily," for instance, is a classic, but it's also Faulkner, meaning written in his dense, slow style. Still, it amounts to a horror story. My students were usually shocked and a little revolted by it (which was great, in a freshman English class).

Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants" is conveyed as if the reader were overhearing a man and a woman talk at a cafe table at a train station. There's no narrative, only dialogue. Yet between the lines you learn the history of the couple and their current, sad situation. It's a marvel of composition, the kind of thing a lesser writer, like me, would never dare, like juggling seven balls at once. "A Clean, Well-lighted Place" is written in Hemingway's typical clean, spare sentences, and it conveys the terrible bleakness of an elderly man (actually two) who has nothing to look forward to.

"The Story of an Hour" is barely two pages long. Every single word belongs precisely, and there are not one but three surprises at the end. It's a jewel of a story. "The Storm" could be a novel, though it's only maybe four or five pages. Once my freshmen realized its point, they were scandalized, some of them. Even today, the point of the story is, well, revolutionary. Her other stories are good, but perhaps not immortal. She's known for her novel, The Awakening, about a woman who rebels against the limits of her time, and they were real and considerable, as anyone familiar with history knows. Personally I didn't find it as riveting as the two stories. There's something about compression that's compelling.

I should think these stories would be available free somewhere--Project Gutenberg, or some similar site. All could be read in an hour, and, like true classics, they are unforgettable.
 

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I read this again a few days ago for the first time in ten years, and
the main character's slow descent into madness
is just an amazing piece of writing.

I urge everyone to DL this.

BTW, it looks like there's a movie adaptation coming out this year: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0790788/
 

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I think I am enjoying discovering the classics (and rediscovering classics) more than all the new stuff that is out there! I am so loving feedbooks more every day!
 

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I love her writing. She also has a book called Herland that is wonderful. It is sort of a comedy, she isn't known for her sense of humor, but it is sort of sarcastic and funny. Very good. I got it at Amazon for Kindle. I don't know if it is in the free sites. Check it out if you can find it. Very much worth the time, and not much longer than The Yellow Wallpaper.
 

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OK, then those who read "The Yellow Wallpaper" might want to consider something that absorbed my students who read it. In the story (can't say about the movie yet) some of them found clues that the husband might be complicit
in his wife's condition, that is, that he helped orchestrate it.
How about that?
 

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BrassMan said:
OK, then those who read "The Yellow Wallpaper" might want to consider something that absorbed my students who read it. In the story (can't say about the movie yet) some of them found clues that the husband might be complicit
in his wife's condition, that is, that he helped orchestrate it.
How about that?
WOW, that IS pretty wild. Never even crossed my mind, but it does make sense. What clues did they discover?
 

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Well, see, that was part of the fun--the hunt for supporting details and then the class discussion. I don't have a copy of the story handy at the moment, but there's no reason we couldn't have our own discussion here on the Boards, like a mini-klub. Want a hint about one of those details?
It had to do with the setting
.
 

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I had read this a few years ago for an English Lit class as well and came to a similar idea CS.  I loved the story and plan on rereading it once my kindle comes in.
 

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What a great idea! We have the link to The Yellow Wallpaper at the top of the first page.

The cool thing about short stories is that they're short. That's why they were so great in class; they were like M&Ms.

Maybe one of our Kindle bloodhounds could sniff out Kate Chopin's stories, The Storm, and Story of an Hour. Both can be read in fifteen minutes, and they're super stories.

Link, anyone??
 

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BrassMan said:
Maybe one of our Kindle bloodhounds could sniff out Kate Chopin's stories, The Storm, and Story of an Hour. Both can be read in fifteen minutes, and they're super stories.
I really like The Awakening. Not a short story though...well short, but not 15 minutes short!

http://www.amazon.com/Awakening-and-Selected-Stories-The/dp/B000OIZT18/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=digital-text&qid=1235144935&sr=1-1

Hmmm...not sure why I cannot get the link with the pick, but I have added it separately.
 
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