Kindle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, last night I sent out my newsletter--I send one every month.] You can see what it looked like here.

This is what my inbox looked like 12 hours later.



You can see that I highlighted the 3 unsubscribes. But I think you can also see why I find monthly emails worth it. (I included the Smashwords purchases because nearly every SW purchase I've gotten has been from the coupon I mail out with every newsletter and in my "thanks for subscribing" newsletter.)

Anyway, I know a lot of people here have said they don't like sending out monthly newsletters because they worry that it'll annoy their readers and get lots of unsubscribes. And yes--I do get some unsubs every time I send a newsletter. But I also announce the newsletter after it goes out on social media, and you can see the result of that as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
bethrevis said:
...But I also announce the newsletter after it goes out on social media, and you can see the result of that as well.
I wondered if I should set that 'send to social media too' button in mailchimp. Looks like it really is useful, thanks for the tip!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
I'm definitely coming around to your way of thinking, Beth. I've been loathe to send too many emails, but many of the list members have approached me on Facebook or Twitter asking for more content. I've upped it a little, and the reception has been favorable.

Thanks for posting this. It seems like I'm on the right track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
David Dire said:
I wondered if I should set that 'send to social media too' button in mailchimp. Looks like it really is useful, thanks for the tip!
I do the "send to social media" thing, but I also add a post to my FB and Twitter that's more like a teaser. It's usually something like, "Newsletter subscribers just got a sneak peek of my next thing! (or whatever) You can subscribe to my newsletter here and not miss a thing: http://bit.ly/bethnews"

I've found the more I make the newsletter seem like exclusive information, the more people subscribe and open it. I saw my biggest boost in open rates when I changed the subject line. I never use "Beth Revis's Newsletter" or whatever now. The biggest difference in subscribe rates has been going monthly and sending social media teasers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
641 Posts
Beth, is that a direct line to the White House by any chance?
Could explain the tremendous response to your newsletter.
Readers are under the impression you have a connection to
the pres. If important people are reading Beth Revis' books,
maybe we should be too.

Hey, every little bit helps.

Nice post, Beth.  ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,651 Posts
Your newsletter looks fab. I love the template, design, palette, content, everything. It's a really smart approach - especially the post-teasing on social media. Love that.

Do you get people unsubbing directly after or does that all look normal? And can you share typical open/click rates on a launch? I'm guessing this approach gives you fab open/click rates with all this extra engagement.

I suppose the main unknown on the "new release only" v "regular newsletter" approach is whether a regular email is a turn-off for those already swamped by email. I know that I personally prefer less emails, but I wonder how common that sentiment is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
dgaughran said:
Your newsletter looks fab. I love the template, design, palette, content, everything. It's a really smart approach - especially the post-teasing on social media. Love that.
Thank you!

Do you get people unsubbing directly after or does that all look normal? And can you share typical open/click rates on a launch? I'm guessing this approach gives you fab open/click rates with all this extra engagement.
I almost always get 2-5 unsubs after sending a newsletter, but I also almost always get 10+ new subs after each one. Despite pushing my newsletter every month, I always have someone on Twitter/FB say, "I had no idea you had a newsletter!" I also usually get someone saying that "You always have neat stuff in there, I guess I better subscribe," so there's a little bit of people waiting to see if the follow-through stays consistent in terms of newsletters.

(It should also be noted that I have an extensive social media based, with 20k+ Twitter followers and 20k+ FB subscribers when my two pages are combined.)

My open rate is typically about 50% when I do the basics and have no major announcement. When I do have a major announcement, I spend a little more time pushing the newsletter (i.e. "Newsletter subscribers will be the first to find out the title of my newest book!") and those will have an open rate of closer to 75%. I also know from tracking links that when I send out a static link to my newsletter, I usually have about 25 new clicks of people who are just reading the newsletter based on my link.

Click rates are typically between 13-25%, depending on content. My last few newsletters have skewed higher than my averages (30-40%) because I've added more exclusive content (launched a new short story and gave the first 500 responders and free copy, announced a book sale, etc.)

I'm pushing 2k subscribers--I've done a few culls to keep MailChimp free, but suspect I'll pass the 2k mark within a month or two. 1500 of those subscribers came from the last seven or so months, when I started sending out monthly emails rather than sporadic.

I suppose the main unknown on the "new release only" v "regular newsletter" approach is whether a regular email is a turn-off for those already swamped by email. I know that I personally prefer less emails, but I wonder how common that sentiment is.
I definitely prefer less emails, but I also found the "new release only" emails to be boring--I often never bothered to click them, because I knew that when I got these newsletters from authors, it just meant another new release. Which means while I was informed of the release, I also didn't care enough to find out more. I also found that many authors would only send 1-2 emails a year, and they either automatically went to my spam folder from email algos or something, or they'd be authors I didn't really remember subscribing to, so I deleted and unsubbed immediately.

Instead, I approach my newsletter the same way as I see news/geek blogs compiling newsletters. I keep the content pretty with a template and images, and I focus on adding more content than just myself. This current newsletter is a little me-centered, in part because this is one that has an actual big announcement in it (first time the book's been on sale ever). Most emails feature at least 3 articles that are just of interest to my readers--they're about sci fi or YA topics, or are just entertainment. Adding articles that aren't me-centered enables me to keep the content interesting--even if people know me and know my books, they'll still open the newsletter based on the fact that they know it contains more general interest topics.

My evidence for this is totally anecdotal, based on my own preferences in emails. I click open io9 and Cracked.com subscriptions because I don't know what I'll find, but I do know it's geared to things that I want to know more about. I sometimes click open daily sale emails (like BookBub) and sometimes don't, depending on my mood--I don't know what books are there, but I do know they're on sale--it's timely information. An author's newsletter is hit-or-miss on opening for me; it's just an "if I have time and am not on an auto-delete spree from too much in my inbox." So I geared my newsletter more towards the general-interest content with the timely information; I consider the ten extra minutes it takes to compile a handful of general interest articles to be a worthwhile effort to put my books in front of the readers' faces. I'm aggregating content to use my books as the advertisements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
979 Posts
This is awesome Beth. Although I'm still a little unclear on where all these subscribes are coming from. Are you sending out your newsletter and then blasting "Some peeps just got exclusive info, join them" to social media, and all those subscribes are from that? Then those new subscribers (besides getting your welcome email) need to wait till next month to see an actual newsletter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
Hi Beth,

Wow! That's crazy! So those signups are all from using FB and Twitter to announce you've sent out a newsletter? I think I've done it once (to Twitter), but don't remember seeing any new signups from it.

Would you consider doing a tutorial on how you put together your newsletters? Particularly choosing what content to include?

Thanks!

Rue
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Domino Finn said:
This is awesome Beth. Although I'm still a little unclear on where all these subscribes are coming from. Are you sending out your newsletter and then blasting "Some peeps just got exclusive info, join them" to social media, and all those subscribes are from that? Then those new subscribers (besides getting your welcome email) need to wait till next month to see an actual newsletter?
I usually do an announcement beforehand, such as "Subscribe by X time and you'll be the first to know Y!" And then after the newsletter, I add the "Newsletter subscribers just found out X--don't miss out next time and subscribe now."

The new subscribers do wait for the next one--although they get a personalized auto responder that features where they can get free content plus a preview of what newsletters are like.

It really is just that--the monthly scheduled newsletters plus 2 tweets and a FB post. This month was a bigger response than normal--I usually get about 20 new subscribers rather than the 40 or so today--but I think that's in part because more people are talking about my newsletters organically (i.e. people tweeting "I just got Beth's newsletter and found out what's happening on Saturday, can't wait!")
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
ruecole said:
Hi Beth,

Wow! That's crazy! So those signups are all from using FB and Twitter to announce you've sent out a newsletter? I think I've done it once (to Twitter), but don't remember seeing any new signups from it.

Would you consider doing a tutorial on how you put together your newsletters? Particularly choosing what content to include?

Thanks!

Rue
Pretty much from social media--and I think the key is that I don't rely on the auto responders/posts, but instead send out teasers that are tailored to my audience.

I did a https://www.reddit.com/r/2cf4vj/tips_on_developing_a_newsletter/ :) But I'm happy to answer any additional questions!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Some links, so you can see what I mean by social media:

Twitter
Tweet 1: https://twitter.com/bethrevis/status/572990522802900992
(then I had two auto-tweets from Instagram and my blog)

Facebook
Facebook post: https://www.facebook.com/authorbethrevis/photos/a.446159316879.247602.372578426879/10153125115921880/?type=1&theater
(No boosting--I never boost.)

Instagram
Post: https://instagram.com/p/zy2lDUhRjU/
Since I'm doing a contest this month, I previewed the prize. I very rarely use IG to promo my newsletter.

And...I accidentally screwed up and sent the newsletter early. (I had it scheduled, but then decided I needed to edit it more and tried to reschedule for the next day, and long story short, I flubbed and sent early.) So I did a blog post that clarified some of the mistakes in the newsletter. I don't think that really helped, though. I don't normally do a blog post when I do a newsletter; I only did it this time because of the errors in sending early (a misleading title from an article I changed and a broken link).

And that was literally it. I saw more buzz on social media from people who had seen the newsletter and were talking about it, and I think that boosted the new subs, but even without that boost, I still get a significant number of new subs with every newsletter. (And typically, my social media posts are more along the lines of "you can get this exclusive info" than "oops, I sent too early," but I think it gets my point across :) )
 

·
Registered
New crime fiction series.
Joined
·
3,523 Posts
That is a snazzy looking newsletter!

I agree it's important to keep in contact at least monthly so your subscribers don't forget about you.

dgaughran said:
Your newsletter looks fab. I love the template, design, palette, content, everything. It's a really smart approach - especially the post-teasing on social media. Love that.

Do you get people unsubbing directly after or does that all look normal? And can you share typical open/click rates on a launch? I'm guessing this approach gives you fab open/click rates with all this extra engagement.

I suppose the main unknown on the "new release only" v "regular newsletter" approach is whether a regular email is a turn-off for those already swamped by email. I know that I personally prefer less emails, but I wonder how common that sentiment is.
I have two lists. One is my regular mailing list (newsletter type). The second one is just for new release announcements. That gives folks a choice. For the new release subscribers I only email when I have new title out and that's it.

Interesting enough, my regular list is larger than the new release only list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
979 Posts
You're definitely doing a great job with interesting content and swag. Thanks for the explanation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,479 Posts
Thank you, Beth! I've been thinking of ways to revitalise my newsletter lately, so this post is timely. Your newsletter is simple yet effective, and mine is...blah. I would never have thought of offering non-book related links and content, but I can definitely see its worth. 
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top