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Well, the reviews are in, and completely divided between people who love my book and people who hate my book. That is to be expected with any novel , right? Can't please everyone. But, I want to say that I am finally bending to what all of you have to say. The bad reviews I have simply say it reads like my book was never edited. That is not the case- I paid an editor $1,200 to edit my book. Boy, was that ever stupid! I seriously regret doing so! So, here are my thoughts now, yes my book is in the wrong category, yes it needs to be re-edited by multiple people( Beta-readers), and yes some people will love it despite all these issues. But you know what? I want everyone to love it, and right now I don't love it knowing that it is riddled with errors. Also, I am musing over that cover, (although I love it so dearly), that may get a facelift too. For now, I will leave it be, but in due time I plan on correcting all the problems with The Bullet List.
 

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I'm not sure what you're saying.
Are you asking whether to edit or not to edit, as your subject line implies?  Why would you NOT edit it, if it so clearly needs editing (again)?
 

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Quiss said:
I'm not sure what you're saying.
Are you asking whether to edit or not to edit, as your subject line implies? Why would you NOT edit it, if it so clearly needs editing (again)?
I'm going to edit, but couldn't think of a good subject line, So I just put it as that.
 

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If it's getting a lot of comments saying it needs editing, I'd hire someone to go over it again. Sometimes it takes more than one editing pass to get everything cleaned up. I still find the occasional typo in my books, all of which were proofed by good editors. Sometimes stuff slips by.
 

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If it needs editing, edit it, again. My books usually have multiple editors. Btw, some ppl will complain no matter what, but if you keep getting reviews that say needs an editor, then have at it. From your other posts, it sounds like you really want to bang your head into the wall. 1st book up is always rough. Learn your lessons and move on. There is no way to make a debut book NOT read like a debut book.

As for writing so that everyone loves it--dude, that'll turn you into little miss crazy cakes. There are always haters, like nasty ppl who will make you want to flush your head down the toilet. Write what you love and love what you write. It'll make you happier.
 

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Are you talking line edits or story edits? Do they complain about plot holes or typos?

I'm curious. I just finished working with an editor, and he did a little of both.
 

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When I checked out your sample, I noticed you really tag every piece of dialogue with something OTHER than said, which is why I think that reviewer commented on your dialogue. He said/she said. Or action tags. Keep it simple.

This bugged me so much I decided I wouldn't read it. That, and the fact that I think your book starts in the wrong place. Those first scenes, nothing's happening. I think you could show me that she gets in trouble with teachers and introduce the love interest while also hooking me on the actual plot, whatever that may be. Someone wants something, yes? Either your protagonist or your antagonist. Go to the first scene in which this wanting is explored. That is the first scene of your book. Cut everything else.

Honestly, I think you're young and inexperienced and your writing isn't ready. You're making typical rookie mistakes. I was lucky that there was no self-publishing when I was your age, and I got to make those mistakes in private. You're doing it in public. And it's not a tragedy. It's happening, but you'll live. All writers make mistakes and get better. You're doing it while possibly making a few bucks, so that's a bonus. :)

Write another book.

As for editing, well...

Sure. Hire an editor if you want, but an editor will not make you a better writer magically. Only writing will do that. Writing a lot.

Write another book.

Then another.

Then another.
 

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Your reviews are, on the whole, positive. You just caught a few wrong readers who were surprised by how dark it was. The edits and cover change will address a lot of the problems. So keep fixing!

- Another round of edits it if that's picking up complaints. Go with editors that have been recommended on these boards.
- Redo cover since it's not conveying the darkness. An inexpensive solution is to see if there are any premades that catches the mood of your book.

Your book is different from the usual fare. So it may be harder to find the right audience. But if and when you find them, it will be rewarding.

Keep expectations realistic, and keep plugging away.
 

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A decent editor (preferrably someone local) should be no more than a few hundred dollars
This has got to be one of the most misguided pieces of advice I have seen lately. A decent editor - one with professional experience in content editing as well as basic copy editing - that is worth their salt will often cost much more than a few hundred dollars.

I would agree that Nikkarina shouldn't be seeing so many errors after paying that price, but that's doesn't mean that good editors come cheap. It simply means she paid for an editor who didn't know what they were doing.
 

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Jnassise said:
This has got to be one of the most misguided pieces of advice I have seen lately. A decent editor - one with professional experience in content editing as well as basic copy editing - that is worth their salt will often cost much more than a few hundred dollars.

I would agree that Nikkarina shouldn't be seeing so many errors after paying that price, but that's doesn't mean that good editors come cheap. It simply means she paid for an editor who didn't know what they were doing.
What Joe said. But I do think it's important to understand what we're referring to when we say "editor."

Kristine Katherine Rusch did a great post a couple of weeks ago about the different types of editors, and I think everyone should read it.

There are different types of editors. Some editors will do more than one type of editing. Others will only handle one aspect.

But the important question to ask is what is meant by "editor"?

Content editing? Line editing? Copy editing? Proofreading?

In general, a content editor is going to cost much more than "a few hundred dollars," particularly if the content editor is also doing line edits. (Line editing and content editing are different skillsets and while often handled by the same editor, sometimes they are handled by different editors, but even when using the same editor you pay more when you get both parts of the task.)

A copy editor also may be worth much more than "a few hundred dollars." But a proofreader, depending on the length of the piece, may not cost more than that.

And then you'll also have different pricing based on the editor's professional background. You're paying for the their time and experience.

I wouldn't recommend paying thousands of dollars for an edit (although that is definitely very possible with many former NY editors going freelance and hanging shingles). But likewise I wouldn't go for bargain basement either.
 

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holly w. said:
...
As for writing so that everyone loves it--dude, that'll turn you into little miss crazy cakes. There are always haters, like nasty ppl who will make you want to flush your head down the toilet. Write what you love and love what you write. It'll make you happier.
Hah! Yes!

You know, I thought about trying to write for money, but dagnabbit, I just love everything I write once I get started.

Nikki, I was lucky with my first book. People liked it and didn't murder it too much.

My second book? Oh, mercy. The overall rating now is not too bad, but a bunch of people savaged it after a few free runs, both on Amazon and GR. I actually quit reading reviews at that point.

If I've learned anything from Amazon, it's that a lack of editing is likely not the factor holding anyone back from Top 100 list success. Hire someone to fix the worst typos, if you must, but write your next book and move on.
 

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Jnassise said:
This has got to be one of the most misguided pieces of advice I have seen lately. A decent editor - one with professional experience in content editing as well as basic copy editing - that is worth their salt will often cost much more than a few hundred dollars.

I would agree that Nikkarina shouldn't be seeing so many errors after paying that price, but that's doesn't mean that good editors come cheap. It simply means she paid for an editor who didn't know what they were doing.
It would be a fascinating experience to see the reactions of some indie writers to editing in the real world. An edit for a print publication can often cost thousands, not hundreds. Several times in the past twelve months we have won tenders for edits of graphic publications that exceed thirty thousand dollars. We are the incumbent publishers for many annual publications that go close to forty thousand. It is why truly experienced traditional editors have no interest in offering services for unknown digital publishers.

In this case, if such a sum ($1200) was spent, then the editor in question must have been asleep. There are too many simple problems for it to have been edited at all.
 

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If the edits desired are for typos/grammar, then I have two suggestions, and I have not read your work or sample:

1. Maybe the pacing isn't fast enough. If a reader gets bored or frustrated for any story reason, they will find errors.

2. The best thing you can do for yourself as a writer is improve your editing skills. It will save loads of time and money, especially if you hire a good editor who will charge by the hour. I don't hire out for edits. I have a great beta reader and sometimes a proofreader for logic problems and then I work without a net, for better or worse. Not everyone can or should do that. Honestly, I can't afford an editor that I would trust to do a good job.

Self Editing for Fiction Writers is a great book. And there are several great ebooks on self editing but I can't recall the titles.
 

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Here are three books that helped me improve my writing.

Editing for Fiction Writers
http://www.amazon.com/Self-Editing-Fiction-Writers-Second-Yourself/dp/0060545690

This is a great book that talks about how the craft of fiction works.

Complete Guide to Fiction and Nonfiction
http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Writing-Fiction-Nonfiction-Published/dp/0131610198/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1360875826&sr=1-3&keywords=the+complete+guide+to+fiction+and+nonfiction

This is a great break down of various elements of the craft

How Fiction Works
http://www.amazon.com/How-Fiction-Works-James-Wood/dp/0312428472/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1360875784&sr=1-1&keywords=how+fiction+works

This is the most similar to my master's degree. If you're thinking about getting an MFA in creative writing, the works cited page is pretty typical of the books you'll be reading, and some of the more esoteric observations are pretty common fodder for term papers. This is the book you read if you want to win a National Book Award or Pulitzer Prize, not very helpful for commercial fiction

From a pep talk perspective, you learn by doing and you are way ahead of all the people who talk about writing a book but never take a chance. Writers write, so never give up.
 

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Dalya said:
If I've learned anything from Amazon, it's that a lack of editing is likely not the factor holding anyone back from Top 100 list success. Hire someone to fix the worst typos, if you must, but write your next book and move on.
This so much!

Wait some time to get more reviews, but in the end do what you think is best. Don't rewrite your book just because a few people don't like a certain aspect of it. There will always be someone who will contradict them. One of my first reviews claimed my characters were unlikeable, that there was no plot, that it was too slow, that the beginning didn't grip them and what not. Then more reviews came in, and suddenly my characters were likable and relatable, people loved the plot, some thought the pacing was just right, other said it was fast, and some said they loved the beginning and that it was just what the book needed. The conclusion: you can't please everyone and no matter what you do, there will be people who will love your book and those who won't. Find someone to edit the book for typos and grammar mistakes, but leave the rest as it is if you like it.
 

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"It would be a fascinating experience to see the reactions of some indie writers to editing in the real world. "
Independents are dealing in the real world. The real world isn't defined by "truly experienced traditional editors have no interest in offering services for unknown digital publishers." They represent one sector, not the world. There are other real sectors. Those monthly wire transfers from Amazon are very real.
 

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David Alastair Hayden said:
I have a great beta reader and sometimes a proofreader for logic problems and then I work without a net, for better or worse. Not everyone can or should do that. Honestly, I can't afford an editor that I would trust to do a good job.
Traditionally speaking, a beta reader or a content editor are the ones who look for logic problems. A proofreader is your last line of defense against typos, spelling mistakes, incorrect verb tense, etc.
 

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I think this review is the best. 2 stars from a reviewer who has been quite tough on other books:

"I feel that if this book had been edited for structure and grammar it would be a five-star read. I will keep my eye out on this author because I do like her voice, but I hope her future books are put together more professionally."

I haven't read the book, and I have no experience with the genre. But the response from your critical readers is encouraging, I think, even if the stars ratings are low. My guess is a $300 copyedit and proofread (instead of deep content edits, rewrites, and line edits) + cover change could help a lot.

Also, maybe reduce the price to $0.99 and see what happens.

 

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Didn't anyone tell you to not read the reviews?

Tell people on your website, twitter and facebook that you're grateful for them, but don't read them. They're for readers. They're definitely not for the author to obsess over or go flip-flopping over whether to pull the book--leave it up--pull it--leave it up.

Shut down your Amazon and goodreads tabs now and write.
 
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Patty Jansen said:
Didn't anyone tell you to not read the reviews?

Tell people on your website, twitter and facebook that you're grateful for them, but don't read them. They're for readers. They're definitely not for the author to obsess over or go flip-flopping over whether to pull the book--leave it up--pull it--leave it up.

Shut down your Amazon and goodreads tabs now and write.
But what if a review points out an important plot hole?
 
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