Kindle Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 58 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
"Amid growing calls for more government regulation of the Internet, the United States is conducting what it calls "a sustained law enforcement initiative aimed at counterfeiting and piracy" - an effort that already has resulted in arrests and the seizure of 125 websites."

I wasn't expecting this but am pleased from a moral perspective. Not sure it makes sense in any other way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
I'm not pleased about the government being given more power, especially over the internet. I doubt they'll be able to stop internet piracy, but I don't doubt that they'll soon find new ways to abuse this power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,859 Posts
The Europeans have announced they are to beef up their laws, but with the international nature of the web I doubt it will stop piracy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,688 Posts
"I doubt they'll be able to stop internet piracy, but I don't doubt that they'll soon find new ways to abuse this power."

I doubt the objective it to stop it. It's probably to reduce the incidence of pirated offerings and downloads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
I wouldn't expect much, this is just our government bowing down to their corporate masters.  You should read about some of the legislation they are trying to pass.  It is basically the same controls that China has over how their people view the web.  Hell, Joe Leiberman even said that the US government should have such controls because the Chinese have them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
This doesn't surprise me. A few months ago Homeland Security seized sites that streamed sports. Of course, it took about a day for people to circumvent it and be up. However, they continue to monitor it and take down sites. It's a weird and annoying battle. A little over a month ago, the FBI and the DOJ shutdown Pokerstars and Full Tilt in the US. I'm disappointed that our government spends money on things that are not only harmless but could make them money if they regulated it. I don't know what our government's doing or why.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,688 Posts
"It is basically the same controls that China has over how their people view the web."

It is the same control because it's the same technology. The control is the same everywhere. Like a light switch is similar everywhere. However, the use of that control is much different in the US than China. For example, Falun Gong has US web sites.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
I had the same thought as Philvan -- how do you seize a website? Guessing they just shut them down. But a lot of piracy website headquarters for lack of a better word are located overseas and out of US legal jurisdiction, and there will always be more popping up to replace them. Unfortunately. It's good that they're at least trying to cut down on it, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,688 Posts
They seize the site by getting an order to remove the name and url from the DNS servers. i think they redirect it to a DOJ url.

This led to the problem between the DOJ and a FireFox add-on that allowed anyone to register an old name and refer it to a new name. So if XYZ was shut down, the owner of XYZ registers with the add-on that his new name is ABC. So people who try to go to XYZ get bumped over to ABC.

The DOJ sent the add-on a letter asking them to stop the service. The add-on responded with a public letter demanding the DOJ show its legal authority. Haven't heard the next step.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
philvan said:
Irrelevant question maybe, but how do you 'seize' a website? Servers have physical entities in their hard drives, but websites?
Seize the DNS listing to redirect the traffic.

DougLance said:
Even though all reports indicate that pirated books increase sales?
Do you have a link to any studies demonstrating that to be true with ebooks?

I'm very familiar with many different studies indicating that sales of physical media increase when free digital copies were made available either legitimately or non-legitimately. Ten years ago I evangelized on how clever Baen Books was to take advantage of that while other publishers didn't. But I've never seen anything indicating that the same is true for the sales of a digital product when an exact duplicate of that digital content is being pirated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
I'd love to see evidence that sales of ebooks are increased when pirated copies are available, too. I tend to be anti-piracy/pro-DRM in most cases (there are certain things I don't like about DRM, but overall, I think it's better than a free-for-all). I personally don't see any incentive for someone to buy an ebook if they've already been given it for free. And if they have full access to a DRM-free copy, what's to stop them from "lending" it to their friends, permanently? If there is proof to the contrary, I'll happily change my stance on the matter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,781 Posts
Justin Alexander said:
Seize the DNS listing to redirect the traffic.

Do you have a link to any studies demonstrating that to be true with ebooks?

I'm very familiar with many different studies indicating that sales of physical media increase when free digital copies were made available either legitimately or non-legitimately. Ten years ago I evangelized on how clever Baen Books was to take advantage of that while other publishers didn't. But I've never seen anything indicating that the same is true for the sales of a digital product when an exact duplicate of that digital content is being pirated.
Look what piracy did for the music biz.
 
1 - 20 of 58 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top