Kindle Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,362 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reading over a number of threads here, I find an abiding theme about how the traditional publishing establishment (including publishers, editors, agents, authors, and even many readers) tend to view indie authors and their books. While it's not always described as such these days, you still hear self-publishing dismissed by these folks as "vanity publishing."

Well, a thought struck me. This appears to be a case of "psychological projection."

Who, after all, makes such a big issue about appearances, respectability, and "acceptance": self-publishing authors, or the traditionally published ones? Who appears to be more sensitive to what their friends, neighbors, and the Publishing Establishment may think of them? Who is willing to put up with interminable delays, lousy contracts, terrible royalties, and even gross abuse in exchange for a Big 6 stamp of approval on the covers of their books?

By contrast, who has declared their independence from such concerns? Who places the main priority on the integrity of their own work, written and published their own way, rather than social appearances and Establishment acceptance?

Who, in short, is in the business of "vanity publishing"?

Just a thought for the day....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,057 Posts
One word for you:  Change.

There's a huge change going on and everyone's scared.  And people who are scared and backed into a corner tend to lash out.  Traditional and self/indie publishing are coming to an even playing surface now.  And it's scary. 

But at the end of the day, we all need each other.  The big guys need the little guys and the little guys need the big guys.  Things will change, and will continue to change, but in the end, people will send queries, agents will sign them, and publishers will sign them too.  On our side, more people will self publish, sell books, and then make a decision from there... remember, right now there's a flood because of people making millions.  Those who are serious about their writing will understand it's a business and will have a plan for long term growth.  They will stay and continue to sell books.
And face it, some will want that feeling of being published by a Big 6 and will go for it.

For me, I tend to sit back and smile and watch the changes.  I'm in this long term, on my own, by choice.  I've always wanted my own company and now I've got it.  And my product is myself and books, so in essence, I'm taking two dreams and merging them together.  I have nothing against traditional publishing, but I like to do things on my own. 


-jb  8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,897 Posts
jimbronyaur said:
For me, I tend to sit back and smile and watch the changes. I'm in this long term, on my own, by choice. I've always wanted my own company and now I've got it. And my product is myself and books, so in essence, I'm taking two dreams and merging them together. I have nothing against traditional publishing, but I like to do things on my own.
-jb 8)
Yes. Yes. Yes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,362 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When I think of the attitudes of exclusionary elites of all kinds -- including Establishment publishers -- I think of that great parody song, "The Cover of the Rolling Stone." Elites prey on the insecurity of wannabes who desire, above all, some sort of "official" affirmation and social acceptance.

The classic response to that insecurity, I think, is the timeless and inspiring "No, thank you!" speech in Cyrano de Bergerac. One of the most moving tributes to artistic independence and integrity ever penned. I nominate it to be the Manifesto of the Indie Author.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
A big issue seems to be cost. I think PAYING one of the companies out there to produce your book, give it an ISBN, a cover, provide you with x number of copies etc etc - I really think those days are going, going, gone. It's been made so easy with Smashwords and Createspace that some of those businesses must be gnashing their teeth - or having to change their business plan and move to covers and editing etc. Some things obviously have to be paid for, but publishing yourself is now within the grasp of all. I don't like the word Vanity - because it implies something smug. I do know that if the opportunities around now, had been there when I wrote my first book, I'd have leapt on the chance to self-publish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,057 Posts
Robert Bidinotto said:
When I think of the attitudes of exclusionary elites of all kinds -- including Establishment publishers -- I think of that great parody song, "The Cover of the Rolling Stone." Elites prey on the insecurity of wannabes who desire, above all, some sort of "official" affirmation and social acceptance.
"Affirmation" and "social acceptance" <--- yes, yes, yes. People just need to believe in themselves and put the work in.


Sorry, had to add this... I love this song. :)

-jb 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Right now we have a window of opportunity that didn't exist five years ago, and might not exist five years from now.

Any time an industry transitions like this, there is always an opportunity for unconventional players to find a niche.  
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
I think that there is a wide chasm between what we do as independent publishers from what vanity publishers did in the days before Kindle or "BK".  In our case, we are the publishers albeit humble and not flashy.  In the days BK, vanity publishers were a surrogate member of the legacy DTB purveyors and charged enormous sums for a person to think that they have published.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
I don't think they will try to shut us down. But I can see that changes might happen which would make it less profitable, less accessible or in some other way less viable an option than it is today.

We may be in the middle of a wild west scenario, and the survivors who got in on the ground floor had a huge leg up on those that came afterward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
I don't see how traditional publishers can shut us down, and if they could I don't think they would try. I'm sure five or so years from now when the industry changes again there will be other things to worry about. Interesting thread, I never really stopped to think about it much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,897 Posts
Somehow shutting us down doesn't seem in the best interest of Amazon. Don't forget they're working the long tail.
Nevertheless, I think we would do well to invest in our own brand and go for reader loyalty.
In addition I sell through my own site as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
I don't see a lot of danger in the traditional publishing houses shutting us down. Yes, the traditional houses are worried, and they're looking for ways to get back the market share that's being eaten (in tiny, tiny increments) by the self-publishing world, but there's too much money to be made by companies like Amazon and Smashwords for them to quietly surrender.

I posted a compare and contrast blog post a couple of months ago on the differences between traditonal publishing, self publishing, and vanity presses. If anyone's interested, go give it a read... I'd love to get some feedback and thoughts on the topic...

http://doortocanellin.blogspot.com/2011/03/traditional-publishing-vs-self.html
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top