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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

World War I - known at the time as "The Great War" - officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of "the war to end all wars."

In Flanders Fields

By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army

IN FLANDERS FIELDS the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.​
 

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In March, 2007 I had a chance to visit some of the WWI battlefields in Flanders, Belgium. Here are a few photos from that trip.

An entry to a trench.



After the war, they quickly buried all the trenches because no one wanted to be reminded of them. Now there are efforts underway to excavate and restore a few of them. This one is just outside the city of Ypres.
 

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Tyne Cot Cemetery and Memorial, with a poppy wreath at the Memorial. This was the site of the Battle of Passchendaele, with close to 500,000 soldiers killed in a six month period. This is a British cemetery.



 

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We also visited a German cemetery, which was very different from the British, American, and Canadian ones. The sculpture is by a famous artist, but I am blanking on the name right now. :(



 

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The city of Ypres was totally destroyed during the war. Winston Churchill wanted to leave it that way, as an "enduring memorial to freedom" but the people of the city had other ideas. It has been totally rebuilt, down to the last brick, to look exactly the way it did through the centuries.

In the middle of the city is the Cloth Hall. Building of the original began in 1200. This is the "new" Cloth Hall, finally finished in 1962. It is the home to a Peace Museum, "In Flanders Fields."

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

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I want to say THANK YOU to all have served. My father was in the Air Force for 30 years and served in Vietnam. Chris was in the Air Force as well and served in Panama during Operation Just Cause in 1989. I have a deep respect and heartfelt appreciation for the men and women who put their lives on the line for our country and our freedom.

July 4, 2007 Chris and I went to DC and visited Arlington National cemetary. If you have never been there and get the opportunity to go, I recommend it. The sheer size and number of graves there gave me goosebumps.

 

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On that same trip to Europe (March, 2007) I visited the American Military Cemetery in Lorraine, France, and saw my husband's uncle's grave. I am the first person in the family to ever visit Uncle Eddie's grave...I thought it was about time. It was very moving. This cemetery is larger than the one at Normandy (D-Day).

 

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Here's the cemetery and the Memorial. My hostess was my friend from Germany. She was a little overcome at the size of the cemetery. I am not quite sure what she expected but I guess it wasn't 10,000+ graves.



 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Leslie said:
Not WWI, but a family favorite ;). That's my dad in the upper left hand corner.
Your father's picture on the cover makes it worth reading, Leslie. Thanks for sharing that with us.

Korea is a forgotten war with many forgotten heroes, but we have Veterans Day so that the rest of us don't forget.

The Red Badge of Courage
by Stephen Crane

Only 50 cents with instant delivery to your Kindle



 

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"an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month"

Interesting - in Germany Nov 11 at 11:11am Fasching starts, which is the party season that continues until Ash Wednesday.

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As a vet, I may I say that I can think of no greater honor than to be entrusted with the peace and safety of our great nation. So on behalf all vets, thank you for your trust. And to those now serving - thank you, and God bless and protect you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
FearNot said:
Interesting - in Germany Nov 11 at 11:11am Fasching starts, which is the party season that continues until Ash Wednesday.
I think "elften elften elf uhr elf" is much older so it is likely to be only a coincidence, but you've piqued my curiosity so I'll look around and if I discover something, I'll send you a PM.

JH
 

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Jeff said:
In addition to FearNot, how many other veterans do we have here?

I know WestPointer1968 is and I remember somebody else mentioning that they were in the Army. Was it Cush?

Was (or is) Sailor really a sailor?
Kellyoz was/is in the Navy (may be close to retiring or just retired, not sure). I think he talked about it in his intro/hi post.

Ann Von Hagel wrote something about her husband. Not sure if she was in the service herself. I know he was stationed in Hawaii and she loved it there.

L
 
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