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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Victoria J said:
Years of rejections took its toll on me emotionally and I became deeply depressed and stopped writing for a few years. I finally pulled out of that and started writing again, mostly for myself. And then a few years later the industry changed and now I see a possibility of making a living at this once again. Don't get many sales but I'm still hopeful and at least I'm published and proud of what I've done so far, if nothing else.
It's a great accomplishment to publish a novel. And like you said, the industry has changed. Self-publishing has evolved so much over the last 5 years. Who knows where it will be in another 5 years.
 

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Less than a year after I started, I got torn apart on that other forum that shall not be named here for things I didn't do. The success of my first romance inspired the vitriol. Since all indie books are crap, my book had to be crap, and therefore anyone who said they liked it was a lying shill. And of course I had to be behind all those lying shills.

When I first indie published it never occurred to me that part of putting books out there meant having to sit there and watch people heap on that kind of defamatory abuse and have no recourse. I came very very close to just packing it in. It wasn't the abuse so much as the inability to answer it or do anything about it. Because in my opinion getting involved in trying to fight back would be like pouring gasoline on a fire. Since that time I've watched it happen to others who did try to fight back, and boy, was I right about how big a mistake that is.

In the years since, it's been a pleasure to watch some of those voices have to shut down because of the much, much greater success of other indie romance authors, although I believe they still torture some vulnerable writers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
DDark said:
Years ago, I stopped writing. Then I had a health scared that landed me in the ER, and the first thing I thought was how I'd wasted that time not doing what I loved. So I started writing again.

And writing.

Sixteen novels later, I had another health scare. And I thought, "Why am I not published?" So I decided to self-publish and give up that dream of getting picked up by a publisher.

Then I had yet another health scare last year, and as I went to the ER, I thought to myself, "But I haven't published all my books. I"m not done yet." Had a three month downward spiral with my health and bounced back. I thought about why those thoughts flitted through my head, of all things. It's because writing is a legacy; it's the way we are remembered. Long after we're gone, someone will tuck themselves under a blanket, turn on their reading lamp, and bury themselves in our stories that still live.

Sometimes life slaps you in the face to remind you of what's important. Your biggest adversity isn't a rejection letter, or not achieving the bestseller list, or even being accepted by family or peers for what you do.

Your biggest challenge is time.
Very well said, powerful stuff. The line that struck me was: being accepted by family or peers for what you do.

I think someone else mentioned this. Why do you think that is? I certainly have had co-workers, family members and others scoff at what I do.
 

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Lisa Scott said:
Various family crises draining my emotions, emptying my heart, making writing almost impossible for a while. This seriously slowed down a nice sales momentum I had reached.
Oh, I can so relate to that right now. I've been editing for most of each day for a while now and I'm coming off of two days of not being able to stay focused. Too many tragedies going on in the lives in friends and family. My hands are tied on all of it, but I can't stop trying to think of solutions, waking up at 1 in the morning. It's draining me. Tonight is better. Getting back into the swing of my work.

Otherwise, my biggest adversity in being a writer is balancing time.
 

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Mathew - I'm sorry for your loss. I have a nine-year-old and simply can't imagine what you've gone through.


I don't like nay sayers or negative people who stomp on dreams.

Adversities?

I did have two life threatening issues, but one was nineteen years ago, and the other, coincidently, was right around the time I started thinking about making an effort to get published. Bucket list thing.

Adversity currently as a published writer?

Those close to me who don't understand what I do, or the amount of time spent writing, editing, formatting, marketing, etc.
 

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kea said:
Oh, I can so relate to that right now. I've been editing for most of each day for a while now and I'm coming off of two days of not being able to stay focused. Too many tragedies going on in the lives in friends and family. My hands are tied on all of it, but I can't stop trying to think of solutions, waking up at 1 in the morning. It's draining me. Tonight is better. Getting back into the swing of my work.

Otherwise, my biggest adversity in being a writer is balancing time.
And then not being able to write makes you panic, making it even harder to write! I hope things work out for you and your loved ones.

Kudos to everyone for pulling through hard times and rejection. You're stronger than you know.
 

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Life sure can throw us terrible tragedies and often we never see them coming. Sometimes recovery is difficult, but we carry on. Hopefully tragedies help us to build our character and maybe our writing skills too.

I am my own worst enemy when it comes to writing. Somehow I never find it good enough or that could have been written better or that paragraph is limp and useless. It's a constant battle with myself. That word is wrong. The not good enough syndrome.

But last week I was reading Lawrence Block talking about all his battles over the decades with publishers and magazines and all the really crappy deals he has seen publishers force on authors and how difficult it has been forever for authors to make money. The adversities were everywhere and usually began with your publisher who the author was trying to please.

It's one thing to battle with yourself about your writing, but when I see all the crap earlier authors had to go through--I'll battle with myself everyday.

After reading LB's non-sugar coated experiences it is easy to see that authors right now are living in a very good time and despite tragedies life throws at us--there has never been a better time to be an author.
 

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LisaGraceBooks said:
Mathew - I'm sorry for your loss. I have a nine-year-old and simply can't imagine what you've gone through.
Thank you Lisa. I have one at 21 months and one at 5 months now, and though I miss their brother (who would be five and a half) daily, I don't have any choice but to continue on. That's how things have to be. We don't get to just give up.
 

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Mathew Reuther said:
During the drafting of this novel my own child, our son, fell ill and died.
Okay, you know what? I was going to harp about the struggles I've had, broken by a few moments of triumph, such as my fiction sales and fan letters, and I was even going to complain about Amazon's recent removal of tags...then I saw this.

Nope. Nada. Not happening. Nothing I can offer remotely compares to that. I say that as a father of a lovely two year-old girl.

Very sorry, Matthew. It's a testament to your character that you're still at. I hope you stick with it.
 

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Jonathan C. Gillespie said:
Okay, you know what? I was going to harp about the struggles I've had, broken by a few moments of triumph, such as my fiction sales and fan letters, and I was even going to complain about Amazon's recent removal of tags...then I saw this.

Nope. Nada. Not happening. Nothing I can offer remotely compares to that. I say that as a father of a lovely two year-old girl.

Very sorry, Matthew. It's a testament to your character that you're still at. I hope you stick with it.
Everything is relative.

Even a minor setback can seem difficult, and we only have our own experiences to draw from.

I have had pain in my life, but so have others.

What matters is that we get back up after our setbacks and press on. Which is all I am trying to do now. :)
 

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Edward

Marry or get into a serious relationship wih someone who undestands and truly respects your love and aspriations for writing. I've observed one constant among all the sucessful indies and that's a LOT of time and effort put into the practice, all on top of lifes other demands.

And get two laptops.

Having to fight for every minute where you can write because you're just "wasting time" on your "stupid fantasy" is a less than ideal situation.

It's an adversity I'd recommend avoiding if possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
D.L. Shutter said:
Edward

Marry or get into a serious relationship wih someone who undestands and truly respects your love and aspriations for writing. I've observed one constant among all the sucessful indies and that's a LOT of time and effort put into the practice, all on top of lifes other demands.

And get two laptops.

Having to fight for every minute where you can write because you're just "wasting time" on your "stupid fantasy" is a less than ideal situation.

It's an adversity I'd recommend avoiding if possible.
Thanks for the advice. ;D And I agree with the last statement, %100. A committed relationship is not worth it if it disrupts your commitment to writing. Being an author is all I've ever wanted, everything else is secondary.
 

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The following lines from the English folk-song "Sir Andrew Barton" have become a sort of self-mocking mantra for me, encouraging me to keep going but also not to take myself too seriously.

'I am hurt but I am not slain.
I'll lay me down and bleed awhile,
Then I'll rise and fight again.'
 

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Generally speaking I'm living this each day. As a newbie I can't look back yet as a successful man with a cocktail in one hand and a masterpiece in the other (ahhhh, one day it will happen, right :) ), but it's just a case of plugging away.

I'm currently writing a non-fiction book where I interview entrepreneurs about the mistakes they have made and how they overcame them, and do you know something? The stories are inspiring and those of adversity. If you keep believing and working hard, good things tend to happen

Matthew
 
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