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I'm thinking country-wise or city-wise, however, if you'd like to talk about a nifty little bar you've been to that no one else really knows about, that would be cool too. 
 

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For me, Bangkok takes some beating.
 

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I have 2.

London, because every street is an adventure, wonderful history and literary reference for an Anglophile. And the British Museum, the most wonderful place on Earth. And the River Thames. And St. James Park. I can't imagine living there and be bored, ever! I'd need several lifetimes to explore it all.

Key West, where I've been many times, and still finding something new. Unlike most visitors, I have a zero interest in drinking, wild bars, or snorkeling in the coral reef. For me it is just such a weird small town, full of history, good and bad and heartbreaking, strange little streets and corners, secret gardens and ghost stories, like a magic box you'd find in the attic. You just need to look closely, and listen. Also, it is just incredibly beautiful and unlike any other place.
 

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I have been fortunate to travel to quite a few places outside of the U.S. and have also lived in Jamaica W.I. and Japan, so THE most interesting place is tough to come up with.

I guess I will say the Franz Josef Glacier park in New Zealand.  I did not know there was a place in the world where you can stand in a tropical rainforest at the base of a glacier and thought that was fascinating.

Really interesting at the time was a visit to Roslyn Chapel in Scotland not long after reading (and enjoying, I'm not ashamed to say) the Da Vinci Code.
 

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We went to Cayman Brac for the first time in 1995 and have returned five or six times since then. It is my happy place and where I learned to relax and be on Island Time... It's hard for a Type-A person to be on Island Time and on the first two trips, the laid-back attitude about time and scheduling drove me crazy (What do you mean the bank is only open in the afternoon once a week?). But now I look foward to times when I can deliberately be on Island Time even if I'm not on Cayman.

http://www.caymanislands.ky/aboutcayman/caymanbrac.aspx
 

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I lived in Persia (Iran) for two years before the fall of the Shah. I had shipped a Land Rover and was fortunate to travel the entire country to experience 3000 years of history. Visiting PERSEPOLIS, the palace built by Darius and destroyed by Alexander the Great may have been the highlight of my lifetime.

 

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NapCat said:
I lived in Persia (Iran) for two years before the fall of the Shah. I had shipped a Land Rover and was fortunate to travel the entire country to experience 3000 years of history. Visiting PERSEPOLIS, the palace built by Darius and destroyed by Alexander the Great may have been the highlight of my lifetime.

Very cool and truly interesting. I wonder if it will ever be safe enough to get there in my lifetime - probably not :(
 

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NapCat said:
I lived in Persia (Iran) for two years before the fall of the Shah. I had shipped a Land Rover and was fortunate to travel the entire country to experience 3000 years of history. Visiting PERSEPOLIS, the palace built by Darius and destroyed by Alexander the Great may have been the highlight of my lifetime.

I would love to see this, but I doubt it will ever happen with politics the way they are. I'm grateful I was able to go to Egypt before things got really scary there.
 

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St Petersburg, Russia

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Hadrian's Wall, England

A place way in west Texas out in the middle of freaking nowhere with nothing around for miles but two tiny one room stores across the road from each other.  We went in the one on the side heading north and talked to the woman.  She said the other store was run by a woman, too.  That they had been running their respective stores for decades and hated each other and never spoke to each other.  ;D

Betsy
 

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Here are a couple....

In Central New Mexico there are a lot of amazing things that are easy to get to and not terribly expensive:

The Bandera Ice Cave--I visited in May, and it was ninety degrees outside, but inside this cave in pumice on the side of an extinct volcano, it was below freezing and there was a huge pool of ice. The volcanic rock is such a good insulator that despite being in the New Mexico desert, it has stayed frozen for several thousand years! I wouldn't have believed it without seeing it.

Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. If you go in late November or in December, you have a chance to see huge masses of migrating geese and cranes. If you arrive in early morning, the geese take off in huge masses, and it is spectacular. I've done this in three different years it is so adddictive to see. I've had over 10,000 geese taking off twenty five feet over my head when the wind was right. The noise was deafening! An amazing spectacle.

Inscription Rock, El Morro. A landmark natural tower of rock with a reliable spring at its base that was a stopping point for hundreds of travelers and explorers as Spanish and Americans entered the area. MAny of them carved their names or stories on the rock. Fascinating to see.

Further afield, London and England/Britain in general are great. A genuine different country with its own culture, yet monolingual Americans can order a meal and read street signs without tears. And there is history everywhere. I remember stepping outside the dorm we stayed at in Oxford and seeing a sign on a house that casually mentioned that Edmund Halley (the comet guy) had lived and worked there.

I don't think I'd go there now, but Tunisia is amazing. Huge Roman ruins sitting unattended by the side of the road. We visited a Roman frontier fort in the sand dunes of the Sahara. I hate to think what the poor German slobs who enlisted thought of it after the North European forests they'd left behind. We also visited an unforgettable marketplace, and visited a group grain storage that was inspiration for some of the buildings in Star Wars: The Phantom Menace (plus I got to sit at the breakfast table where Luke Skywalker argued with his uncle over "just one more season"!)


 

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The Hooded Claw said:
Here are a couple....

In Central New Mexico there are a lot of amazing things that are easy to get to and not terribly expensive:

The Bandera Ice Cave--I visited in May, and it was ninety degrees outside, but inside this cave in pumice on the side of an extinct volcano, it was below freezing and there was a huge pool of ice. The volcanic rock is such a good insulator, it has stayed frozen for several thousand years! I wouldn't have believed it without seeing it.

Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. If you go in late November or in December, you have a chance to see huge masses of migrating geese and cranes. If you arrive in early morning, the geese take off in huge masses, and it is spectacular. I've done this in three different years it is so adddictive to see. I've had over 10,000 geese taking off twenty five feet over my head when the wind was right. The noise was deafening! An amazing spectacle.

Inscription Rock, El Morro. A landmark natural tower of rock with a reliable spring at its base that was a stopping point for hundreds of travelers and explorers as Spanish and Americans entered the area. MAny of them carved their names or stories on the rock. Fascinating to see.

Further afield, London and England/Britain in general are great. A genuine different country with its own culture, yet monolingual Americans can order a meal and read street signs without tears. And there is history everywhere. I remember stepping outside the dorm we stayed at in Oxford and seeing a sign on a house that casually mentioned that Edmund Halley (the comet guy) had lived and worked there.

I don't think I'd go there now, but Tunisia is amazing. Huge Roman ruins sitting unattended by the side of the road. We visited a Roman frontier fort in the sand dunes of the Sahara. I hate to think what the poor German slobs who enlisted thought of it after the North European forests they'd left behind.
Here are photos to go with the above. You'll have to figure out which ones are which!













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I've not been a world traveler, but I must say my most interesting vacation was in Wyoming, USA, when a couple summers ago I went on a Road Scholar trip to Thermopolis WY, where I learned about the dinosaur and other fossil sites there, did some actual digging, and even some lab work. Maybe I'll see if I can dig up my photo thread here and post a link.

PS: Here you go: http://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,191257.0.html
 

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Hmm this is a really difficult one for me to answer! There are places I've been like Rome (which I didn't like all that much), Athens and Pompei that were fascinating but don't quite hold it for me...

Then there's Paris. I lived there for 6 months so it was interesting in a completely different way (I still have some habits I picked up there too!)

But Egypt probably clinches it! I was lucky enough to go when I was younger and got to visit Cairo and Luxor. Seeing the temples and the Valley of the Kings was amazing. Plus Ancient  Egyptian culture has fascinated me since I was small. I'm surprised I haven't used it as inspiration to write anything yet....Though there is time!

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i’ve put off answering this, because “interesting” is not a word i really use.  so after thinking about it, i figured i’d put the place(s) i would most like to revisit.

and the top of that list would be Bryce Canyon in Utah.  I love the Grand Canyon, but if given the choice would rather go back and spend more time in Bryce.

the second place would be Frogner Park in Oslo.  It’s a sculpture park and we spent a bit of time there, but i would love to spend more without the irritation of a tour guide and schedule.
 

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As a Brit who has only been abroad five times I'd have to say the Maltese islands or Norway. Went to a couple of small villages on the fjords in Norway 2 years ago that were quite unique. Bergen was also interesting in the sense that it was obviously foreign but some things were similar to a small English city.
 

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I spent 6 years in the Navy and got to travel quite a bit: Caribbean, Atlantic, Europe, Northern Africa, Turkey. After the Navy I traveled a lot in the US and Canada. I have been to a number of interesting and fun places in my travels.

The most interesting place in my opinion is Belgium. It might have been when I traveled there as I was in Passchendaele and Tyne Cot 100 years to the week after the first gas attacks in the trenches; 200 years after the Battle of Waterloo; and 71 years after the Battle of the Bulge. Walking through all that history in the places that shaped modern Europe was something I won't forget.

Deckard
 
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