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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Latin is insanely rusty.

I THINK I have these right, but is anyone madly skilled?

to serve and protect=
ut servo quod servo  OR  ut servo quod vallo (defend)

and

served fresh daily=
servo vegetus cotidie
 

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I wanted to ask my Latin scholar, but he is sleeping after a late night of Star Craft or Halo or ????
Here's what I wondered about the second one: does the adverb precede the noun? (ie, cotidie comes first?) Sorry I can't remember. . .
 

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As I recall, word order is arbitrary in Latin...but I havne't dealt with it in about 10 years.
 

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It has been a very very long time, but....

You're using the first person forms of the verbs it looks like to me.

To serve and protect should be

Ut ministrare et servare. (or even "minstrare servareque" but I'm not sure if the "-que" is used with verbs or just with nouns.)

Really not sure with the 'served fresh daily' other than you're again using the first person form, and the verb should come last. To be a literal translation you should probably use a passive construction: "(These items) served fresh daily." Which, I think, would be "ministratur" for third person present passive.

But I also thing that the concept of "fresh daily" doesn't translate at all that well. (Vegetus is more a behavior thing -- like "lively." Or like a teenager who acts fresh.) Made fresh daily is more like how they would say it.

"cotidie recens fiunt" or even "cotidie fiunt"

Camille
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think I may need to switch to work around "served" somehow.  It could work as a bastardization, even.

GAH.
 

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here's the answer:

Probably the most straightforward would be:
Custodire et Servire
custodire: from this Latin root we get the word "custodian" for example, so it's easy for English speakers to recognize it as a result
servire: this is the basic Latin word for "to serve" - and since it is instantly recognizable to English speakers, it's probably a good choice

This could be fun, with the Latin word play:
Servare et Servire
servare: from this root we get words like preservation, conservation, etc. - although it's harder to recognize right away for non-Latin speakers, since in English we don't use the uncompounded form "servation"

Another possibility:
Tueri et Servire
tueri: very interesting verb which has the meaning of "see" (hence intuition) but also look at, watch, protect (hence tutors and tutelage, etc.) - but like with servare, it's not immediately recognizable to English speakers

Thanks go to Laura Gibbs, Latin Scholar Extraordinare
Translator of Aesop's Fables
 

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Nathan and Camille,
Your posts seriously gave me happy goose-bumps. Now I can't wait for my kids to get back to Latin this fall. (Yeah, they love it, we're all language geek-y types here.)
Hee-hee!
Cidney
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nathan, you are the bomb-diggity.

For anyone curious, I have started earnest work on the second book in my new series (first comes out in a few weeks).  I have some running themes, including hidden messages and signs.

One of my secondary characters is a tattoo artist,  Eddie Lee, who was teased a lot as a kid.  He also does local sign painting.  Among his quiet acts of revenge? Being a nerdy genius who messes with people too stupid to catch him.  The high school bully THINKS he is wearing a tattoo with characters saying "fierce warrior" when they actually say "pork lo mein."  And when the local police station is destroyed, the town relocates to the only building big enough and empty: the former Dizzy Donuts shop across the street. Eddie is asked to re-design a logo for the cruisers and front door.

He places the old town seal inside a life preserver (it's a coastal town).  Around the logo on all cruisers and the new police barracks?  In stead of "to protect and serve" will be "served fresh daily" in Latin.  Also, if you stare at it long enough you realize the life preserver looks like a donut... with sprinkles.
 

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Vale!

News from the field.

the problem is that "serve" is like "servant" and not like "dinner" ... so one can serve the public, but the famous cookbook "To Serve Man" isn't going to use the same "servire" root.

you'd need to go something like:

"offered fresh daily"
nova quotidie oblata

or maybe

"provided fresh daily"
si quotidie nouae

or perhaps

"prepared fresh daily"
paratus cotidie noui


given some of the military mottos -- like the Coast Guard's "Semper Paratus" -- you could probably offer a fake translation like "ready for anything" (which would actually be "nihil preaparari")

 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That was the root of the struggle, actually.  I wanted it to sound (read) in a way that would not draw a critical eye.

It may not work in the end.
 

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oliewankanobe said:
That was the root of the struggle, actually. I wanted it to sound (read) in a way that would not draw a critical eye.

It may not work in the end.
Oh, olie, don't you know the sad reality? No matter what you do, someone will find fault. Find what works best for you and go with it.
 

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oliewankanobe said:
Nathan, you are the bomb-diggity.

For anyone curious, I have started earnest work on the second book in my new series (first comes out in a few weeks). I have some running themes, including hidden messages and signs.

One of my secondary characters is a tattoo artist, Eddie Lee, who was teased a lot as a kid. He also does local sign painting. Among his quiet acts of revenge? Being a nerdy genius who messes with people too stupid to catch him. The high school bully THINKS he is wearing a tattoo with characters saying "fierce warrior" when they actually say "pork lo mein." And when the local police station is destroyed, the town relocates to the only building big enough and empty: the former Dizzy Donuts shop across the street. Eddie is asked to re-design a logo for the cruisers and front door.

He places the old town seal inside a life preserver (it's a coastal town). Around the logo on all cruisers and the new police barracks? In stead of "to protect and serve" will be "served fresh daily" in Latin. Also, if you stare at it long enough you realize the life preserver looks like a donut... with sprinkles.
That makes a huge difference in translation: the latin is going to be very different depending on who did the the translating. Someone who was good at latin? Someone with a sense of humor? Someone who vaguely remembered something from that one year of latin which he flunked? Someone who just looked it up on the internet?

You could always do something like: Semper ubi sub ubi. (Word by word literal translation: Always where under where. thus: "Always wear underware.")

Or the poem which is nonsense in Latin, but when read aloud comes out in English:

O Sibili, si ergo! (Oh see, Billy, see her go!)
Fortibus es in ero! (forty buses in a row)
O Nobili! Demis trux. (Oh no, Billy, them is trucks.)
Si vatis enim (See what is in 'em?)
Causen dux. (Cows and ducks.)

I remember remember our latin professor very pedantically teaching the correct translation of "Don't let the bastards get you down." The one most people hear and use is wrong on every level. "Illegitimi" is formal usage: "illegiitmate children" not "bastards." "Carborundum" or "Carborundorum" makes no sense as used at all. It comes out meaning something like "neither illegitimate children grinding down."

Instead he used it as the day's lesson in the ne sinas (or "do not allow") construction.

So here is the real translation: Ne nothos te deprimere sinas.

Camille
 

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One last try. Here's Laura's suggestion to maintain the pun:

Laura Gibbs - Paratus is the way to go, since that is often found in mottoes (Semper Paratus is the Boy Scout motto, for example) - if you want a good pun, how about this "Sale Paratus" - which means "prepared with wit/intelligence" (that would be a very legitimate motto) OR "prepared with salt" - since the Romans used the word "sal" to mean both "salt" as in food, but also "wit"
 

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I took some Latin in high school, but all I remember how to say is this one dirty sentence that I've burned into permanent memory.

Here's a little question, if anyone can help. I want to say something that's a little different than the typical "Requiem" as a chapter title.

Requies is apparently the verb that requiem is drawn from. So if I say "In Requies" does that make sense in Latin? Or should I be using a different ending for that same verb? If it should be different, what should it be? Essentially, I want to say "in repose." Or, I could say "at rest." I definitely want to use some form of "requies."

If you can help, thanks very much.
 

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MosesSiregarIII said:
I took some Latin in high school, but all I remember how to say is this one dirty sentence that I've burned into permanent memory.

Here's a little question, if anyone can help. I want to say something that's a little different than the typical "Requiem" as a chapter title.

Requies is apparently the verb that requiem is drawn from. So if I say "In Requies" does that make sense in Latin? Or should I be using a different ending for that same verb? If it should be different, what should it be? Essentially, I want to say "in repose." Or, I could say "at rest." I definitely want to use some form of "requies."

If you can help, thanks very much.
"in repose" might be something like "in requietum"
 
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