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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The following first appeared in The Vincent Zandri Vox:
http://vincentzandri.blogspot.com/2011/05/why-go-indie-control-control-control.html




I love these stories.
Stories about old "legacy" model published authors switching to the indie publishing model (be it self-publishing or traditionally based small indie), and achieving so much success they can then make a good living from their fiction.

Terry ODell is one such author who, previously published by Five-Star/Gale is now pursuing self-publishing. In her newest blog at Terry's Place (http://terryodell.blogspot.com/2011/05/e-publishing-dangers.html), ODell spells out the pros and cons of making the move from the old publishing model to the new indie model. I'm repeating them here. And even though they are specific to her individual circumstances, I'm sure these pros and cons will speak to each and every author who frequents the Vox:

Pros:
No lengthy wait time.
Keeps "new" material in front of readers.
Royalty payments come directly to me.
It's not as much of a 'suspense' as the other books, and the 'covert ops' side of things is less of a focus, so it's quite likely the publisher wouldn't have acquired it anyway, since they no longer have a romance imprint.

Cons:
To ensure quality, I paid a free-lance editor and a cover artist out of pocket. I also made the decision to keep the cover "similar" in tone to the other Blackthorne books, even though it's not an obvious "romantic suspense." And because I used photographs I'd taken, I saved some money there.
I had to deal with the other things a publisher normally does. In the case of an e-book, that means formatting it for the various outlets (and there are different requirements for each). It also means I'm solely responsible for marketing.
Regardless of what's pro about ODell's situation or con, the one thing that sticks out most of all is the control she now has over her books. From writing, to bringing them to market, to editing, to cover design to marketing, she is solely responsible. No longer is she at the mercy of a publisher who might take three months to consider her new material only to reject it in the end, or what could even be worse, accept it but not publish it for a a year to two years and then hang on to the rights for a decade beyond that.

One thing I'll suggest to Terry is that if she considers editing and marketing a "con" she might think about submitting her material to a popular maverick indie press like StoneHouse/StoneGate Ink. It's true she would be expected to market like crazy on her own, but their marketing efforts would also increase her chances of breaking into the Top 100 Kindles and/or Nooks exponentially. She also wouldn't have to worry about editing, formatting, conversions, covers, etc. They would naturally do all that for her, allowing her more time and, more control over that time.

Time better spent writing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I still think the best way is a mix of self-published material, indie/small press, and major press....But for now, I like working with the indies...
V
 

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I'm a firm believer in the old adage: "Never put your eggs in one basket."

I feel (and forgive me if you disagree) that by not submitting anything to the traditional markets (novels or short stories) ones writing could become stagnant. The rejections are a constant influx for striving to be better, without that, I see writers growing comfortable. Now I know this will not pertain to everyone, but I do feel it is a possibility.

What motivates you to excel?
 

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keithdbz said:
I'm a firm believer in the old adage: "Never put your eggs in one basket."

I feel (and forgive me if you disagree) that by not submitting anything to the traditional markets (novels or short stories) ones writing could become stagnant. The rejections are a constant influx for striving to be better, without that, I see writers growing comfortable. Now I know this will not pertain to everyone, but I do feel it is a possibility.

What motivates you to excel?
Perfectionism. Which is not actually a positive trait, I find. ;D
 

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keithdbz said:
I'm a firm believer in the old adage: "Never put your eggs in one basket."

I feel (and forgive me if you disagree) that by not submitting anything to the traditional markets (novels or short stories) ones writing could become stagnant. The rejections are a constant influx for striving to be better, without that, I see writers growing comfortable. Now I know this will not pertain to everyone, but I do feel it is a possibility.

What motivates you to excel?
Whether the publisher is a corporation or myself, I'll be motivated by reader feedback. If the book isn't resonating with readers, reviews will reflect that and provide guidance for me to improve. If I'm on the right track, then readers will tell me so. Theirs is the only opinion that matters to me.
 

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ilyria_moon said:
Perfectionism. Which is not actually a positive trait, I find. ;D
It just means you care about your craft and the impact you want to leave on your readers. Lord knows half the "popular" writers don't.
 

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"Perfectionism." Well that's a pipe dream for anyone  ;)

"If the book isn't resonating with readers, reviews will reflect that and provide guidance for me to improve."

Valid point, however, not every reader can articulate an analytical response to help you grow into the writer you could be.
 

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keithdbz said:
"Perfectionism." Well that's a pipe dream for anyone ;)

"If the book isn't resonating with readers, reviews will reflect that and provide guidance for me to improve."

Valid point, however, not every reader can articulate an analytical response to help you grow into the writer you could be.
Perfectionism is very real as a process, not an end product. When I finally published Swallow for Kindle, after months of revisiting it with a fine toothed comb I noticed ONE comma in the manuscript, instead of a full stop. I couldn't leave it, so down the book came. ;D
 
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