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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is Sherlock Holmes so popular because he is the world's best known detective, is it the new ELEMENTARY TV series?

My favorite is "Jack the Ripper versus Sherlock Holmes." With 6 illustrations. The historically accurate treatment of Jack the Ripper and his crimes, and his interaction with Sherlock Holmes, make this IMHO a very striking book.

Read what you like, like what you read- good reading!

Phillip Duke Ph.D.
 

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Hmm. I've dabbled in writing my own Sherlock Holmes continuation, but Case Book is still under copyright in the US, until 2023. My ideas build off that, so I've tabled them, for now, though I suppose I could write and release it only in specific countries wherein the book's in the public domain.

(Note: I'm not a lawyer, and this isn't legal advice. I'm just conveying my own understanding of what's going on with the character's copyright and what I'm doing because of that understanding.)
 

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Was this thread made just to promote your book?


Mind, you I like Sherlock Holmes. I watch Elementary, but like it despite what they did to the characters. I'd have liked them better if they weren't specifically Sherlock and Watson. Probably more disappointed, because I love the BBC version of Sherlock with Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman.
 

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Carradee said:
Hmm. I've dabbled in writing my own Sherlock Holmes continuation, but Case Book is still under copyright in the US, until 2023. My ideas build off that, so I've tabled them, for now, though I suppose I could write and release it only in specific countries wherein the book's in the public domain.
Since the characters and certain trade dress is trademarked you have to go through the estate anyway to get a license to use them. You might be able to see if they allow you use to make a derivative work before the story itself goes into public domain.
 

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tensen said:
Was this thread made just to promote your book?

Mind, you I like Sherlock Holmes. I watch Elementary, but like it despite what they did to the characters. I'd have liked them better if they weren't specifically Sherlock and Watson. Probably more disappointed, because I love the BBC version of Sherlock with Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman.
I am especially fond of what they did with Dr. Watson's (Martin Freeman's) character in the BBC iteration. Not so toothless as before. I can hardly wait to see what they do with the whole multiple-wives confusion.
 

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Sherlock Holmes is the perfect flawed hero. I'm loving Elementary. I love how Watson is needed to keep Holmes on an even keel (as even as is possible) but she uses her medical knowledge and brains too. And I love that Holmes uses his brain, certainly, but he can kick butt too.
 

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I adore (and might even have a crush on) Holmes. Don't tell. :)

The original works are wonderful. They were nothing like I thought they would be, nor, frankly was Holmes or Watson. I've yet to read a pastiche that can hold a candle to the original. I did enjoy the first few Laurie King books, but she lost me somewhere along the way.
 

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Big Sherlock fan here, especially the BBC version. I listen to a podcast called Great Detectives of Old Time Radio and they have a huge collection of Sherlock Holmes mystery radio show episodes that I enjoy listening to.
 

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I haven't seen Elementary but I'm a huge fan of the BBC's Sherlock. It helps that I love the actors playing Sherlock and Watson. But I don't think either show has much to do with Sherlock Holmes' popularity, since it was preexisting. As a kid I watched the black and white movies with Bazil Rathbone portraying Sherlock and as a teen I watched the made-for-TV versions with Jeremy Brett, who I think played the part closest to the books.

Since I've crushed on every Sherlock portrayal I've ever seen, I'm pretty sure it's something about the character himself as Doyle wrote him. Possibly his remoteness. It's a quality he shares with Star Trek's Spock, who I also liked, so I think that's it.
 

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tensen said:
Since the characters and certain trade dress is trademarked you have to go through the estate anyway to get a license to use them. You might be able to see if they allow you use to make a derivative work before the story itself goes into public domain.
Sherlock Holmes is trademarked? I did not know that.

Its a good thing I never mentioned the detective who appeared in one of my steampunk novelettes by name...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My Sherlock Holmes books remain popular. It seems that interest in Sherlock Holmes and Doctor John H. (Hamish) Watson is perpetual.
 

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Sherlock Holmes fits nicely into the trickster archetype, and tricksters have been alluring throughout recorded literature.

The trickster character is a character who is smooth, untouchable, and emotionally manipulative. This person knows more than everyone else around him or her, knows everyone’s secrets, and is willing to use those secrets to further his or her own aims.

Sometimes a villain, sometimes a hero, but always intriguing.
 

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valeriec80 said:
Sherlock Holmes fits nicely into the trickster archetype, and tricksters have been alluring throughout recorded literature.

The trickster character is a character who is smooth, untouchable, and emotionally manipulative. This person knows more than everyone else around him or her, knows everyone's secrets, and is willing to use those secrets to further his or her own aims.

Sometimes a villain, sometimes a hero, but always intriguing.
Yep, same reason James Bond is popular.
 

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phildukephd said:
Is Sherlock Holmes so popular because he is the world's best known detective, is it the new ELEMENTARY TV series?
Phil,

Personally, to me, CBS' Elementary is garbage and bears more resemblance to CSI: New York than to Sherlock Holmes. Heck, The Mentalist has better TV writers!

If one must bring Holmes into the modern era that way, at least do it right and keep him the world's brightest detective, in the style of Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss' reinvention on BBC, Sherlock, which is a completely brilliant update and features the my absolute favorite Holmes actor of all time, Benedict Cumberbatch.

(Of course, I will always have a soft spot for my first Holmes actor, Basil Rathbone, who defined the role for me as an impressionable kid on late night, old-time movies. The movies were not that true to Conan Doyle, but hey... that was who I became accustomed to as Holmes growing up in the 1970s and into the 1980s.)

I personally was never a big fan of Jeremy Brett, which I know is blasphemy to some, who absolutely worship him and consider him the ONLY actor worthy of playing Holmes. But his adaptations were very dark and morose, I thought -- overly serious and, for me, never captured the "fun" of Sherlock Holmes' adventures.

Also, I don't consider Robert Downey Jr to be Holmes anymore than I consider Jonny Lee Miller to be Holmes.

But at least Downey Jr's Holmes-like creation is fun to watch. Miller's looks like he could be outwitted by James Roday's Shawn Spencer on USA Network's PSYCH.
 

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I've written a few Holmes stories in the past few years. The first one was THE QUALITY OF MERCY in Gaslight Grotesque. Since then I've done THE CALL OF THE DANCE, published in the Lovecraft ezine, THE COLOUR THAT CAME TO CHISWICK in Gaslight Arcanum, I'm in the middle of a collaboration on THE GHOST SHIRT with Steve Lockley, and now I have the novella from Dark Regions, SHERLOCK HOLMES: REVENANT. It is out now in both paperback and ebook.

Revenant will also be included in the forthcoming hardcover collection SHERLOCK HOLMES: THE QUALITY OF MERCY and other stories. Coming in the summer from Dark Renaissance -- and yes, I did go through the Conan Doyle estate.

It is the characters first and foremost that draws me to it. Doyle brought Holmes to life. He is instantly recognizable all over the world and has been for over 100 years. Few other writers have managed that trick.
It's also the setting for me. I was raised on Doyle, Wells and Robert Louis Stevenson and I love that historical period they covered in their work. It's also the time period I've come to prefer for my own writing and I can see me settling in there for a long time to come.
 

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Holmes is popular, like some people said already, because he's a trickster.

There are all these new shows like Suits, White Collar, Burn Notice, that all basically build on Holmes' character type.

He's that guy that knows it all. He's never beaten (except that one time, and we don't talk about that).

Even Monk is Holmes minus cool and plus obsessive disorders.

He's just a really good character!
 

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ellendominick said:
He's that guy that knows it all. He's never beaten (except that one time, and we don't talk about that).
Four times actually. In "The Five Orange Pips", Holmes mentions that he has been beaten four times, thrice by a man and once by a woman. ;)
 

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Sherlock Holmes was my gateway into literature, and to this day some of my favorite stories. I remember being enthralled at how effortlessly Holmes was able to deduce so much by simply looking over an individual. As a kid I started trying to employ the same method on the people around me. And it worked to a much lesser degree. I would look at other kids and try to sum up some details about their lives from what they wore and how they acted. As I got older, I realized it also helps to listen to what they're saying.  ;)

To this day I still subconsciously employ the same methods. I note wedding rings, what type of watch their wearing, if they're tan, etc...

But the reason I think writers love Sherlock Holmes so much is that he is the ultimate observer, which as a writer, you want to be. If we are going to tell a story, it's the details that sells the idea. A good writer needs to show, not tell. And so saying that the attractive, wealthy, young woman drank her coffee lazily is nowhere as good as saying the woman dangled her Gucci shoe from her foot while occasionally sipping her latte, causing a constant distraction for the male barista (please excuse the poor writing example, hopefully you get my point). I would think all writers start to turn into a bit of a Sherlock Holmes themselves over time.

And as for other media; my deep love for Sherlock Holmes has turned me into a pretentious purist. I don't watch Elementary, I did enjoy the Guy Ritchie films, but I just pretend they are about someone else, but... I absolutely love Sherlock on the BBC. Brilliant modern day adaptions and incredible acting. The Series 2 finale was one of the best episodes of television I've ever seen. I'm happy for the success of the cast, but I hope they return soon.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents on why I think Sherlock Holmes is so popular, especially to writers.
 
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