Kindle Forum banner
61 - 70 of 70 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,209 Posts
jason10mm said:
The real question is whether or not peoples tastes change as they age/mature, or do they tend to cling to the tech of their era and get left behind as younger generations adopt new tech.
I think most people do get set in their ways from around middle age on personally. Be it things like clinging to technology, or their political beliefs become set etc.

Your point about expensive home theater set ups etc. is a little different. Some people are just into movies and music and not into the technical side of it and don't care about having high end equipment etc. I don't think that's really related to age, beyond--as you note--that you have to be into a career and making decent money to afford it. Point being that's not really an issue of whether one is comfortable with technology or not, as it is whether one really cares about screen size, video quality etc. Personally, I'm big into movies and prefer watching on my 50" HDTV--but I'm not a video/audiophile so I don't have (and will never have) top end equipment.

I do think there's some generation gap on the portability thing--as discussed above younger people tend to be out and about more and thus have more use for portable gadgets. I also think there's something there with the rise of Youtube and other short video streaming sites etc. I think attention spans have shrunk and younger generations are more used to bouncing around to a bunch of different things--watch a short video rather than a whole movie, then surf the net a while, then listen to a song or two (rather than a whole album). Life's gotten a lot faster paced with a lot more multi-tasking and younger generations seem to embrace that more. Even only in my 30s I notice how much more comfortable my college students and younger friends are with that kind of pace compared to myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Talking about "clinging" to technology shows a bias that people ought to adopt new technology. What's really going on is that people continue to use technology that works for them. YouTube works just fine on my desktop computer. I have a quad core desktop with a nice big screen. A tablet would be fun, but for me, it would just gather a lot of dust. I don't have a smart phone because I balk at the monthly bills for these things, I'll stick with my prepaid cell phone. People have always used gadgets, but each generation thinks that they invented gadgets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,209 Posts
QuantumIguana said:
Talking about "clinging" to technology shows a bias that people ought to adopt new technology. What's really going on is that people continue to use technology that works for them. YouTube works just fine on my desktop computer. I have a quad core desktop with a nice big screen. A tablet would be fun, but for me, it would just gather a lot of dust. I don't have a smart phone because I balk at the monthly bills for these things, I'll stick with my prepaid cell phone. People have always used gadgets, but each generation thinks that they invented gadgets.
Very true. I'm not in anyway implying that there's anything wrong with clinging to technology. There's no value judgement intended in any of my posts, just simple observations (maybe boring to some, but again I'm a social scientist so this stuff interests me!) :D

And you kind of make my point. It's not that each generation thinks they invented gadgets. It's just that new gadgets are always targeted as the 18-35 crowd and their lifestyles so they're more drawn to them on average than older folks who are fine with their existing gadgets like you are. So many new gadgets don't fit the lifestyles of people outside of that age group so a lot of older people stick to the gadgets they started using when they were younger as those still work fine for them and fit their lifestyles.

Your point on tablets is a good example of this. They'd gather dust for you as you don't have much of a need for them, same with smartphones. You're fine with a desktop and a pre-paid cell phone. Younger folk tend to not have desktops these days (myself included) as laptops and tablets are better suited to their constantly on the go lifestyle vs. older folks who are more likely to spend more time at home (especially if they have kids, or are retired and on tight budgets etc.). Pre paid cell phones don't work for most younger folks as they talk and text a ton as they've had cell phones since they were tweens or teens etc.

It's not a value thing, or thinking gadgets in general are new and invented by the younger generation. It's just that gadgets are designed primarily for younger folk who have more disposable income etc., and thus adoption of cutting edge gadgets is always highest in the 18-35 crowd usually.

As a side point, e-readers are a notable exception to this, with average owner age being quite a bit higher than most cutting edge gadgets. I suppose that's reflective of leisure reading being less prevalent among youths. That could change if e-readers/tablets end up being used more in schools and colleges down the road though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,323 Posts
BTackitt said:
Hands down .. CUSTOMER SERVICE.
Break the screen on your kindle? replacement at your home in 2 days for free, no real questions asked.
The other issues, battery life, no glare, lighter, are important but this is the ultimate winner for Kindle. You can't beat their customer service.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,209 Posts
JRTomlin said:
The other issues, battery life, no glare, lighter, are important but this is the ultimate winner for Kindle. You can't beat their customer service.
Amazon does indeed have great service. I've never had to deal with Kindle service specifically as I've never had any issues with my K1, K2 or K3 nor any books I wanted to return etc. But the regular Amazon service is second to none, and from what people have posted on here is seems like the Kindle service department is even better.

That said, Apple's customer service is excellent as well in my experience. At least in Apple stores (if you have one nearby), I've never dealt with their online service.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
556 Posts
I like the iPad and all, but I really don't like it for reading books. Yeah I don't mind the iPad for magazines and such, but for actual books I like a simple interface like the kindle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,209 Posts
JenniHolbrook-Talty said:
I love reading on my iPad now, but not via the iBookstore. I like the way the kindle app reads. Plus, I have zillion books there that I re-read all the time. But this article makes me nervous.

http://www.macrumors.com/2011/06/30/will-kindle-survive-apples-deadline-for-ios-content-purchasing-compliance/
That's old news.

Apple recently changed the new rule. They're no longer going to require in app purchasing be an option as they were at the time that was written. The only required change now is apps like the Kindle app can't have a button or link in the app that jumps out to a website to buy content. But they can still use content, users just have to manually buy content in a web browser and then download it in the app.

Here's a story about that: http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/09/apple-gives-in-to-publishers-changes-policy-on-in-app-subscript/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,209 Posts
JenniHolbrook-Talty said:
The problem is the Kindle App still has this buy button and the rule goes into effect soon.
Yep. But all Amazon has to do is update it and remove it. They're probably just leaving the button there as long as possible, and will update to remove it right before (or after) the rule change. No reason to get rid of it any sooner than they have to.
 
61 - 70 of 70 Posts
Top