Kindle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If so how much as a percentage of the sales price?

Personally I'm not a fan of DRM, not because I want it easier to find ways to steal from authors/publishers but because it is a pain in the ass for me as a consumer to share something I've read with another family member or friend short of letting them borrowing my Kindle or registering their Kindle on my account, neither of which are going to happen unless they are in my immediate family. 

I also hate saving multiple copies of the same work for each of my purchases to my computer for each of my e-readers (yes I know Amazon will store these forever for me) but I like having my own backup.  I also foresee in the not too distant future of going over the 6 Kindle limit for one account between buying the new Kindles that come out and buying Kindles for my kids, etc.  I don't want to have to deal with that PITA which I think will be inevitable.

So I plan to put my money where my mouth is and support websites such as Smashwords if they have a non-DRM version of something I want even though Amazon may have the same thing with DRM with a 20% discount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Red said:
Nope. I've been using ereaders for over a decade. I could care less about DRM one way or the other.
Is this because you don't share books with family members? Because if it was just me I don't think I'd care quite so much either. However, most DTBs I've boughten go through 3-5 people in my household, which under current Amazon restrictions isn't a problem with e-books. But as I've said I foresee, as new readers come out and my current Kindles either break past the warranty date or just get phased out due to upgraded readers coming on the market, a huge PITA to have Amazon restore my 6 book limit for those that have already been downloaded to 6 different units.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
The DRM topic is an interesting one. I have no problem with DRM'd content. If someone who worked hard to create something does not want that to be shared with others for free, I can understand that. If I were the type of person that wanted to be able to share my ebooks with others, I would have no problem paying more for a non-drm'd version.
If I buy a DTB, I can read it, then give it to my wife for her to read, then loan it to a family member, then mail it to a far-off relative to read, etc. What I wouldn't be able to do with that book is send it to 500 people at a time, and have those 500 people each pass it off to each of their many friends, etc.
There are SO many different ways to handle the DRM issue, but here is one that I think would be a cool feature:
Imagine that you buy a book for your Kindle, and you think that your <insert friend or relative here> would love it and you want to share the book with them. But the other person is not on your Amazon account. So you hit the menu while in the book, and see an option called "Send to a Friend". You hit that option, it prompts you to enter your friends Kindle's email address, and it sends a DRM'd copy of the book you bought to your friends Kindle. Maybe these DRM'd books, once sent, are tagged with a 30 day license, giving that friend 30 days to enjoy that book. After the 30 days, if the friend wants to keep that book he/she could be prompted to buy a copy for themselves from the Amazon store. Or if they read the book and didn't think it was worth owning, they could simply delete it after 30 days. Maybe each book can be forwarded from the owner only a certain number of times, or maybe not.
I'm not giving this example as the only way, or even the best way, but it is something that is possible right now (the music biz has been doing it for a while). It could be done in any myriad of other ways. But, the issue of being able to share books with others is possible, for companies that want to pursue it.
I think that the DRM issue also points out that for many people, reading can be a social activity. People want to share books, talk about books with others, even read together. I think that many companies, at least by their model, assume that reading is a purely solo activity. I'd be interested to hear how other people would like to see the DRM/Sharing issue handled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,791 Posts
The beauty of getting rid of DRM is that we have the freedom to purchase from any source.

Here is a quote from Steve Jobs regarding DRM and music. This was from 2007 and since then Apple has removed DRM from their music in the iTunes store. This should be the model for ebooks also

Imagine a world where every online store sells DRM-free music encoded in open licensable formats. In such a world, any player can play music purchased from any store, and any store can sell music which is playable on all players. This is clearly the best alternative for consumers, and Apple would embrace it in a heartbeat. If the big four music companies would license Apple their music without the requirement that it be protected with a DRM, we would switch to selling only DRM-free music on our iTunes store. Every iPod ever made will play this DRM-free music.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The DRM issue is an interesting one, I'm definitely in the camp that DRM primarily hurts legitimate purchasers of the content more so than those who are going to pirate anyway.  I also lean towards the opinion that non-DRM doesn't hurt the authors financially, but I sure don't know for sure.  I do however agree that Amazon/Authors/Publishers can put it on their books if they so choose.

What I'm trying to discern is is there a monetary value we as consumers place on DRM vs non-DRM content?  For me, yes to an extent.  I am willing to pay somewhat more for non-DRM to avoid the potential hassles of DRM.  How much, I'm not sure yet and I'm treating it on a case by case situation where a choice is available.  

For example if there were a book on a DRM free site for $5 and the same work on Amazon discounted to $4 I in all likelihood will buy the $5 version.  Personally I'd like to see the non-DRM option available on more books and let the market sort it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,981 Posts
The only reason I care about DRM is if I decide to change readers, non-drmed material would allow me to move my entire library. I rarely share books when I have them in DT form so I am not stressed about sharing books via e-book. Although it would be easier to share an e-book. If I got to keep my copy of it and I didn't have to worry about getting it back, I would probably share e-books.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ProfCrash said:
The only reason I care about DRM is if I decide to change readers, non-drmed material would allow me to move my entire library.
That is one of my main reasons against DRM as well. Go 5-10 years down the road, something better than Kindle comes out, what the heck do I do with the 1000 or so books I've purchased during that time? Send them to the e~dustbin?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,981 Posts
Forster said:
That is one of my main reasons against DRM as well. Go 5-10 years down the road, something better than Kindle comes out, what the heck do I do with the 1000 or so books I've purchased during that time? Send them to the e~dustbin?
My guess is that by then it will be a non-issue and someone will have the software to transfer the stuff that had the DRM on it. I have faith that this will be solved and that the appropriate fixes will be in place.

Part of the reason I went with the Kindle was because of Amazon's customer service and wider selection of books. If I have to stay in Amazon and they are competitive with other sites, I am not worried about the device.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
I have close to 1,000 ebooks that I purchased before the Kindle was available that I would love to be able to read on my Kindle. Unfortunately, due to the DRM on the books I can't.

My position is I bought the ebooks and I think I should be able to read them on any device I choose. I don't think I should be able to give copies to other people, while still keeping a copy myself. JMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ProfCrash said:
My guess is that by then it will be a non-issue and someone will have the software to transfer the stuff that had the DRM on it. I have faith that this will be solved and that the appropriate fixes will be in place.

Part of the reason I went with the Kindle was because of Amazon's customer service and wider selection of books. If I have to stay in Amazon and they are competitive with other sites, I am not worried about the device.
I actually have some faith that this will be a non-issue at some point down the road. I really think the publishing industry is going to go down the same road as the music industry with regards to DRM. In the interim I'll try to move the process along by purchasing non-DRM when I have the option.

But.....just look at the stink Amazon/publishers raised with the DRM'd mobi books that Kindle users had previously purchased and then wanted to be able to modify the DRM so the books could be read on their Kindles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,981 Posts
I think they can prevent people from giving away books left and right with the idea of the license. Right now, most books come with 6 licenses. That limits the number of people who can read the book on different Kindles. It can be a pain in the butt for people who are upgrading regularly or who have had problems with a Kindle and had to send it back but it is also a way to control book sharing.

So non-drm with licenses sounds like a plan to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,566 Posts
I'm on the fence with this. As a writer, I don't really care if you share a print copy of my book with 10 of your friends; that's no different that people checking it out from a library. Electronic copies are trickier, because the base of potential people with whom one might share expands from a few select friends to hundreds of thousands of strangers.

I have been burned by the presence of an online copy of my first book; only the first chapter was supposed to appear but the entire text was available, and by the time the mistake was discovered it was estimated that 25,000 copies had been downloaded. If even half those people had intended to eventually purchase the book...that's a lot of money out of my pocket, and a lot of people who did, in effect, steal from me.

DRM keeps some people who might be inclined to take something that they didn't pay for from doing so, but it doesn't stop the true pirates out there...and most people are basically honest and they wouldn't make available for mass downloading someone else's work. So truly, I am conflicted about DRM and non-DRM.

That said, I would pay a little more for non-DRM books simply to be able to swap the books across platforms. But I cringe at the potential for abuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,791 Posts
I think the vast majority of people who are DLing stuff for free would not pay for it though. There seems to be some pull to the concept of free where we will gather all kinds of things that are free just because they are free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
I agree with what a few others have said. In the future this will be a non-issue. I think they will work it out in a similar way that the music industry did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
kevindorsey said:
I think I'd pay a small % on a book purchase just to get rid of DRM. What a useless sham.
It's unfortunate, but the publishers obviously see a use in it. I hope we get to a point in society where it isn't needed anymore. It's really more of a frustration than anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,391 Posts
In my case, I seldom share any books I purchase with anyone else. Therefore from that perspective, I would prefer that the content either be limited (via DRM or any other method) so that it is not easy to share, which should -- in theory -- keep the unit cost down. Should a publisher decide to release digital content in a non-DRM format but at an increased price, then I, in fact, would prefer to still have an option to purchase that book with DRM but at a correspondingly reduced price, so that I do not have to pay for a hypothetical right to share that content when I have no real need to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
What about a system where you could "transfer" a book to any other Kindle user, at which time said book would be deleted from your account and added to the recipient's? That would prevent mass copying, and would be, in effect, the same as passing on a DTB to another reader.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
I'm not a fan of DRM, and I'm pretty vocal about it. I understand WHY it exists, but I honestly think it hinders more than it helps. Apple (with iTunes) has the right idea, and is pushing forward with it and influencing many others in the process. Since DRM exists on Kindle books, I take on the view that I'm paying to ACCESS a book rather than OWN it, which is why I don't think I'll ever go nuts and buy every book I want on the Kindle. I definitely won't stop buying paper books that I can actually hold in my hand and say 'I own this'.

If you want people to buy your books rather than steal them, there's a simple solution that doesn't involve DRM:

MAKE THEM WORTH PAYING FOR.

Radiohead and Nine Inch Nails had the right idea, and started a whole new pricing model of 'paying what you think it's worth'. It's spurred a lot of new pricing models as well, and will continue to for a while. Right now is a time of experimentation. Everyone's still figuring out what works and what doesn't, and that applies to all sorts of media, including eBooks.

As much as I dislike DRM, I don't think I would ever pay more to have a non-DRM version of a book. I think that's completely unfair and unjust, because what you're then doing is punishing the people who would potentially support you and NOT steal your stuff by charging them more. Not to mention adding more payment options only complicates matters that don't need to be complicated for consumers.

The funny thing is that, despite all our complaints of DRM, we're still using the Kindle and enjoying it and making plenty of Kindle book purchases. Why? Amazon has a massive library, and if we want to buy their eBooks at their prices, we're stuck with DRM. So we suck it up. Because of this, I think it's going to be a while before we see some change. If we're still buying their books, and publishers are satisfied with the DRM restrictions in place, why would they want to change?

I think what *may* happen in the near future, though, is Amazon bringing in a feature that will allow Amazon Kindle users to share books with other people on different Amazon accounts, similar to how DRM'd music from iTunes used to work (play on up to five devices at any one time). It's a temporary solution to a permanent problem, but at least it will be something.
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top