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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I'm wondering if I'm the only one who does this; when I'm in my research mode, as I find something i just put a line or so at the bottom as a reminder.  This way I have my 'notes' as a reminder all the time.  Once I come to a good insertion point I then can write about the note, and when done erase it.  I've done it this way for as long as I've been writing books as I've tried to outline before but it doesn't work for me.  Any ideas?  I even did this for my new blog.

N
 

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What do you mean you put it in a line at the bottom? As in a footer of some sort? Does this ever get confusing?

I use Scrivener, so I have a separate page for notes that I can check easily and if I have enough of them, I use split screen to keep them under my manuscript pages. I also split screen my outline if I need to. If I need to make random notes or reminders within each chapter, I comment in the inspector on the side that way I see it whenever I look in that chapter. I don't know what I'd do without Scrivener.

As for my own tricks, I have distraction issues. If I'm at the computer, then I can't help myself but to do stuff online. The only way to avoid this for me, is to be without the computer as much as possible (which isn't so bad since I hand write everything first) and be alone with no background sound. So, to help my productivity, I write in 15 minute bursts. Fifteen minutes of pure writing, then 15 of goofing off. I also like to participate in word sprints or use the twitter hashtag #wordmongering with other people, and if I'm alone, I set a timer for 15. I find that I'm more productive this way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great points, thank you for posting.  No, I do the low tech thing and just put the notes at the bottom of the document, they are pushed down as I write.  For me it's great as they keep reminding me of where I am going.  I used to hand write everything, but my writing is so bad I would get to a point where I could not read it!  Is the program you mentioned for a Mac?  Do they have a PC version?  Thanks again for the interesting thoughts.

N
 

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ndrake said:
Great points, thank you for posting. No, I do the low tech thing and just put the notes at the bottom of the document, they are pushed down as I write. For me it's great as they keep reminding me of where I am going. I used to hand write everything, but my writing is so bad I would get to a point where I could not read it! Is the program you mentioned for a Mac? Do they have a PC version? Thanks again for the interesting thoughts.

N
Scrivener was originally Mac only, but now there is a PC version in beta. I hear it works well, but if you use it, be sure to have back ups because it is still in beta and may have a few bugs, but it will be coming out fully in August, I think. Here's a link if you're interested. http://www.literatureandlatte.com/scrivenerforwindows/ The great thing about Scrivener is that it can be as simple as any other word processor or as complex as you need it to be. Good stuff.

And now I understand what you mean by adding notes at the end. It's an interesting approach, but I think it would drive me insane. Though, maybe I'd forget less if I did something like that. Haha.
 

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NRWick said:
What do you mean you put it in a line at the bottom? As in a footer of some sort? Does this ever get confusing?

I use Scrivener, so I have a separate page for notes that I can check easily and if I have enough of them, I use split screen to keep them under my manuscript pages. I also split screen my outline if I need to. If I need to make random notes or reminders within each chapter, I comment in the inspector on the side that way I see it whenever I look in that chapter. I don't know what I'd do without Scrivener.

As for my own tricks, I have distraction issues. If I'm at the computer, then I can't help myself but to do stuff online. The only way to avoid this for me, is to be without the computer as much as possible (which isn't so bad since I hand write everything first) and be alone with no background sound. So, to help my productivity, I write in 15 minute bursts. Fifteen minutes of pure writing, then 15 of goofing off. I also like to participate in word sprints or use the twitter hashtag #wordmongering with other people, and if I'm alone, I set a timer for 15. I find that I'm more productive this way.
I use a split screen, but as far as inserting things I need to research I make a line of dots to tell me I need to find, say, a great cabernet sauvignon to go in here, and move on to the action in the story. At some point I'll check the wine sites for the exact one I need, with grape notes, etc. Works for me.
 

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GerrieFerrisFinger said:
I use a split screen, but as far as inserting things I need to research I make a line of dots to tell me I need to find, say, a great cabernet sauvignon to go in here, and move on to the action in the story. At some point I'll check the wine sites for the exact one I need, with grape notes, etc. Works for me.
Oh, yes. I sometimes do that too. It's especially bad when I'm on a roll and don't want to get out of my groove. Usually I'll do something like this, though: "They moved towards the silver [SOMETHING] and hid behind it." Based on context, when I proofread and edit, I will know that I need to look up the type of car I want the characters to be hiding behind. I also do it when there is a word I can't seem to remember, but I know it exists and it's perfect for what I need. It makes it pretty easy using the [SOMETHING] tag so I can go back through and do a find on them in case I missed any on the edit/proofread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Very good!  I thought i was the only one that did that.  Knowing me though sometimes I will change the color of the text just to be sure...

N
 
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