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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For my Vella project I decided to use a teenager MC since Vella will likely be aimed at a younger audience.

However, I've decided to switch to multiple POV's instead of just that one character.

So now I'm wondering if I should make all my other POV's teenagers as well, or can I use some adults in the mix?

I've never written (or read) YA before, so I'm hesitant how to approach this.

PS. The initial teenager will remain my main POV character, if that makes a difference.
 

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Making all the POV characters teens is smart, but not if it hurts the story. YA has adults ofc but I've never seen their POV featured.
 

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I really like the idea, but I'm not a YA person, so grain of salt here for sure. It might be something that falls on the older end of YA. Somewhat older readers might want to see adult perspectives happening at the same time as their protagonists, but I could see it not landing as well on the younger end of YA. Maybe it's something that could be perfect for readers who are "growing out" of YA. Like, readers who have read a lot of YA and still love the genre but are starting to look for something new. I feel like a lot of stories for younger readers are samey-samey, which makes sense because they're written for readers who haven't read a ton of stories before. It sounds like an awesome idea, but like I said, I'm no YA expert. If it was me though, I'd definitely try to aim the story towards an older YA reader rather than a younger one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I really like the idea, but I'm not a YA person, so grain of salt here for sure. It might be something that falls on the older end of YA. Somewhat older readers might want to see adult perspectives happening at the same time as their protagonists, but I could see it not landing as well on the younger end of YA. Maybe it's something that could be perfect for readers who are "growing out" of YA. Like, readers who have read a lot of YA and still love the genre but are starting to look for something new. I feel like a lot of stories for younger readers are samey-samey, which makes sense because they're written for readers who haven't read a ton of stories before. It sounds like an awesome idea, but like I said, I'm no YA expert. If it was me though, I'd definitely try to aim the story towards an older YA reader rather than a younger one.
I'm not into YA myself, so I'm tempted to go in that direction as well.

I can't help but think of all the epic fantasy I've read that feature a teenager MC despite NOT being YA (The Dragonbone Chair, The Belgariad, etc.)

Maybe that'd be a better approach. Offer some teen perspectives for the younger audience, mixed in with some adults for the older readers?

Bah. I don't know. LOL.
 

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This is kinda like a genre question. It depends on your content. Try to stay in the same genre and age group. You can skate the line, but try to border along the same product. Sell toys in toy stores, cars as cars, you know.

Without seeing your work, from your description, I'd advise all your shorts stay YA POV to keep your audience engaged. This is marketing advice. My art advice says do whatever the hell you want.

My new book borders YA, but I chose not to market there. It follows a teenager for a third of the book and then adult/ adult. It's really 16+. So it sounds similar. Mine is enough adult to not be considered YA, imo. It's just fantasy.
 

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I don't see a lot of multiple POV YA, but it does happen. I have never seen an adult POV as a feature character.

Unwind is the series that comes to mind for most POV characters in YA, though it is in close third person. Most of the scenes follow a teen. I want to say all but it's been awhile. It's a pretty good series if you can get past the logic flaws in the initial premise. (Which is mostly fine but oddly connected to abortion. You'll see).
 

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I don't know, but adults are background characters in the YA books I've read.

But. When I'm watching CW-ish shows, I often find myself more interested in the parents. Vella is a new thing, so I'd think there's some wiggle room for new tweaks to reader expectations. Not breaking with the norm is probably a safer bet, but playing it safe is boring.
 

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For my Vella project I decided to use a teenager MC since Vella will likely be aimed at a younger audience.

However, I've decided to switch to multiple POV's instead of just that one character.

So now I'm wondering if I should make all my other POV's teenagers as well, or can I use some adults in the mix?

I've never written (or read) YA before, so I'm hesitant how to approach this.

PS. The initial teenager will remain my main POV character, if that makes a difference.
I see multiple POV in YA Fantasy/UF sometimes, but I don't remember reading any from an adult's perspective unless maybe it was a snippet before a major death or the catalyst that starts off the major conflict of the story. In other words, like one very short scene, and the rest were the main teens.
 
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Thia is a good thread. I've thought about this, and if I was posting something fresh on Wattpad, I'd definitely go with teens for the main characters as many readers on there are youngsters. But really it could only be experimental for what I usually write. However, this Vella platform is not Wattpad, or any of the other FREE to write and read as you go mediums.

As I said, this is not a free to read platform, so I imagine that while it would attract a younger audience, it will be for those with a disposable income after entering the jobs market and having left education behind. Those will likely have moved from the teen stuff, to wanting more of new adult character content they can better identify with. Maybe not so old, but not teen YA. Just my thoughts.

I would also be wary of writing in a style and a voice of younger characters that doesn't come naturally if it's set in the here and now.

Most of my eBook main characters are around 29, with my latest WIP having the female MC at 26. That is as low an age I would consider comfortable writing about. But that's just me.
 

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I don't think it's rules as much as audience interest. When I read YA, I want the life and death stakes of being a teenager. Everything feels like the end of the world, even if it's a contemporary story about two best friends who are secretly in love.

I don't want to read the POV of reasonable adults with lots of life experience.

There are many other style trends that separate YA and adult fiction. I read YA for all those things (more focus on coming of age themes, more focus on strong themes, less romanticizing of things I would rather not see romanticized like war and abusive heroes).

If you call your story YA, hit all the things YA readers want. If you don't call it YA, don't worry about those things.

(I'm mostly talking contemporary YA and dystopian YA. I don't know YA fantasy. Rules might be different but learn the rules before you use genre labels. You don't have to follow the rules but you want to know how to position your story to appeal to the right audience. If I pick up a YA romance and the guidance counselor is a POV character, I'm going to be confused).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't think it's rules as much as audience interest. When I read YA, I want the life and death stakes of being a teenager. Everything feels like the end of the world, even if it's a contemporary story about two best friends who are secretly in love.

I don't want to read the POV of reasonable adults with lots of life experience.

There are many other style trends that separate YA and adult fiction. I read YA for all those things (more focus on coming of age themes, more focus on strong themes, less romanticizing of things I would rather not see romanticized like war and abusive heroes).

If you call your story YA, hit all the things YA readers want. If you don't call it YA, don't worry about those things.

(I'm mostly talking contemporary YA and dystopian YA. I don't know YA fantasy. Rules might be different but learn the rules before you use genre labels. You don't have to follow the rules but you want to know how to position your story to appeal to the right audience. If I pick up a YA romance and the guidance counselor is a POV character, I'm going to be confused).
I'm not planning to label it as YA. I'm just concerned about audience age and expectations.

Maybe I'm overthinking this, though :D

I'll likely end up doing a mix, kinda like Tad Williams' "Memory Sorrow Thorn" series.
 
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