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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know we have talked about this before but I am upset at what is happening to the cost of Kindle books. I have a long "wish list" at Amazon with maybe 20 to 30 books in it. When I first made it 2 months ago there were many of my old sci fi books for under $2. Now there is nothing under $3.50. There were many books that were $3.95 -$5.95 that all seem to be $9.95 now. I don't think this is a temporary thing for Christmas. I think Amazon had good book prices as an incentive to sell enough Kindles to reach a critical mass and also to reach a certain public awareness. I think, with the help of Oprah and Ellen, they have reached their goals, and I think the great pricing of old is over (except for "specials" they will have from time to time). I think we had better get used to paying close to what the paperback version of books will cost.

At least this should be an incentive for publishers and authors to made their books available in Kindle format because without the cost of printing, binding, and delivery, they will be making a lot more money per book (or maybe Amazon will make the extra profit, I don't know how they divide the revenue). Is there an author who can explain how the revenue from selling a Kindle version is divided up, as opposed to selling a paperback or hardcover version of the book?

Steve
 

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stevene9 said:
Is there an author who can explain how the revenue from selling a Kindle version is divided up, as opposed to selling a paperback or hardcover version of the book?
The DTP Kindle policy is here: http://forums.digitaltextplatform.com/dtpforums/entry.jspa?externalID=2&categoryID=12

These are the pertinent paragraphs:

4. Pricing and Program Terms. As part of your Application, you will provide us with a suggested retail price for each Title ("Suggested Retail Price" or "SRP"). The Suggested Retail Price you provide to Amazon must be consistent with the SRP you have provided to other retailers and wholesalers. However, we have sole and complete discretion to set the retail price to our customers for Digital Books. We are solely responsible for all promotions and solicitations to be used in connection with the marketing and sale of your Digital Books, and for processing payments, payment collection, requests for refunds and related customer service, and we will have sole ownership and control of all data obtained from customers and prospective customers in connection with the Program. You acknowledge that we have no obligation to market, distribute, or offer for sale any Digital Book or part thereof, or to continuing marketing, distributing or selling a Digital Book after we have commenced doing so.

5. Royalties. Provided you are not in breach of your obligations under this Agreement, we will pay you, for each Digital Book we sell, a royalty equal to thirty-five percent (35%) of the applicable Suggested Retail Price for such Digital Book, net of refunds, bad debt, and any taxes charged to a customer (including without limitation sales taxes) (a "Royalty").

The Print on Demand structure for paperbacks is more complicated but here's an example:

The list price on one of my books is $15.95. If I pay an annual fee they charge me $15.36 so I make $0.59 per copy. If I don't pay their fee they charge me $25.10 and my royalty would be -$9.15. Needless to say, I pay them.

http://www.createspace.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow Jeff, authors get screwed. Do you know how the income to an author from a book (non kindle) compares between Amazon and a regular retail bookstore like Barnes and Noble?

Steve
 

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stevene9 said:
Wow Jeff, authors get screwed. Do you know how the income to an author from a book (non kindle) compares between Amazon and a regular retail bookstore like Barnes and Noble?
Deals vary widely. Book stores don't buy books; they take them on consignment and if they don't sell them, the publisher (or self published author) gets them back. Amazon's methods avoid that expense so at least the ink is never red.

The easiest complete answer to your question is that less than 1% of novelists make a living from writing and only a tiny fraction get rich. Most of the writers I know write because they love to write. To me it's exactly like reading. When I write I get to go anywhere at any time in the past, present or future. The money's not important.
 

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What a rotten deal for the authors!!  I'm really hoping that Amazon raising prices is temporary but understand it might not be.  If the price hikes persist..... my Kindle book buying will come to a serious end (except for any bargains).  I'm thankful for the books I've been able to get so far!!
 

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I am trying to get a backlog of books at lower prices now so in the event the prices go up I'll have something to read, and the cost of the kindle is not negated.
 

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In the almost year I have had my Kindle I have gotten some really good deals. But right now I am holding off buying much as the prices are just getting nuts. I even went to the used bookstore yesterday instead. Told my husband I love my Kindle but there is only so much I will pay for a book, especially when I can read 3-5 a week. -Hopefully Amazon will drop the prices back to reasonable so that we can all continue to enjoy our Kindles.
 

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In another career I had the pleasure of visiting Clive Cussler's home at the top of a mountain in Colorado. While the gentleman I brokered the deal for discussed business with Mr. Cussler his lovely wife and I visited and enjoyed the view out the panoramic kitchen windows. When the business was concluded I enjoyed visiting with Mr. Cussler for a while as well. Both he and his wife were as genuine and nice as could be and if you didn't know who he was you'd have no clue he is a celebrity. He's a very nice "regular guy". Anyway, he must be one of the exceptions to the rule.
 

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LDB said:
In another career I had the pleasure of visiting Clive Cussler's home at the top of a mountain in Colorado. While the gentleman I brokered the deal for discussed business with Mr. Cussler his lovely wife and I visited and enjoyed the view out the panoramic kitchen windows. When the business was concluded I enjoyed visiting with Mr. Cussler for a while as well. Both he and his wife were as genuine and nice as could be and if you didn't know who he was you'd have no clue he is a celebrity. He's a very nice "regular guy". Anyway, he must be one of the exceptions to the rule.
This is a fascinating story, so forgive me for asking: What exactly does it have to do with this thread? :p
 

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CS said:
This is a fascinating story, so forgive me for asking: What exactly does it have to do with this thread? :p
ser·en·dip·i·ty (sěr'ən-dĭp'ĭ-tē) n. pl. ser·en·dip·i·ties

The faculty of making fortunate discoveries by accident.
The fact or occurrence of such discoveries.
An instance of making such a discovery.

Probably more serendipity than whimsy...
 

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LDB said:
He's a very nice "regular guy". Anyway, he must be one of the exceptions to the rule.
It's a nice story; I just want to know what the "rule" is and where it was mentioned?

On Topic-I haven't noticed the price increases that everybody on the Amazon board is (are ??? ) complaining about but I wouldn't-almost everything I buy is $9.99.
 

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Interestingly enough, a book I bought for $1.36 is now $1.19 (don't remember which one, but it was in the bargain books posts this morning!)

Betsy
 
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